West coast cycling route

It has been a couple of weeks since I had been out on the bike and I was keen to get a few miles in the legs.  A quick circuit of some of the western parishes, with lunch thrown in for good measure seemed like a good idea.  It is interesting just how many good cycling routes on Jersey, particularly if you know where to look.  We started along the Railway Walk, surprised how many people were out walking.  It appears that the Island is managing to attract a reasonable number of active visitors during the autumn months .   The Railway Walk is such a great resource for visitors and locals alike.
The cycle route turns north at Les Quennevais and skirts around the Airport, where there was still some activity after yesterday’s Battle of Britain Air Display.  From there we cycled through St Peter’s and down the narrow lanes into St Peter’s Valley so that we could ride on the recently opened cycle track.

Cycle route
Nicky on the St Peter’s Valley cycle route. A great new facility.
Cycle route
The cycle route is slighty raised in places and runs along a wooden board walk.

The track has come in for some criticism from some people in the media but it is a valuable addition to the islands network of cycle routes.  Hopefully there will be many more developments to come.
One of the great things about cycling in Jersey are the number of narrow, virtually traffic free roads, which are available to be explored including the Green Lanes.  Around the Island there are about 50 miles of roads where the maximum speed limit is 15 mph and priority is given to cyclists and walkers.  They were designated from 1994 onwards, and are perfect for cycling along.

La Dimerie
A very pleasant route along a road, La Dimerie, from St Peter’s Valley up to St Mary’s.
Cows
In a couple of places we passed small herds of Jersey cows. I might be biased but I think they are prettiest cows out there.

Once we had cycled up La Dimerie we had regained the higher land of St Mary and passed through the village with its lovely parish church.

St Mary's Church
En route we passed one of the 12 Parish churches on the island, St Mary’s.

Our destination was a little know feature alongside one of the roads in the parish of St Ouen.  There aren’t that many places on the island where it is possible to see whale bones.

Whale bone
Towards Plemont we passed this road side arch. Jutting above the right hand side of the arch can be seen the ends of a whale rib. The whale was supposedly washed ashore in 1726 at Le Pulec (Stinky Bay).
Whale ribs
Looking at the whale ribs from the side.  They are clearly starting to show their age.

After the excitement of whale ribs we were in need of some food and chose the delights of Plemont Cafe, with its extensive views of the other Channel Islands.  Features were particularly clear as we were under the influence of Polar Maritime air.
From here it was a particularly easy run along the west coast of the Island, passing the St Ouen Millenium Stone on the way.   25 miles of varied cycling, mostly on designated cycle routes or virtually traffic free lanes.

Millenium Stone
Each parish has a Millenium Stone, The one for St Ouen is at the top of L’Etacq, overlooking St Ouen’s Bay
St Ouen's
From above L’Etacq the whole of St Ouen’s Bay lay before us. The northerly wind was going to help blow us home.