Two classic Scottish Munro’s

The forecast was for rain spreading from the south so we looked for a couple of Munro’s which might just be in the rain shadow of the mountains to the south.  We chose Beinn Achaladair and Beinn a’Chreachrain, two mountains just to the north of the Bridge of Orchy.
I had seen these mountains on numerous occasions when heading A82, whilst en route to or back from a sea kayaking trip on the west coast coast of Scotland.  This would be the first time that I had the opportunity to venture onto their slopes.
Arriving at the start there was an immediate change to the, the car park is no longer close to the farm as mentioned in the guide books or shown on the 1:25,000 O.S. map but just on the right as you leave the main road.  If we had read the excellent walkhighlands website before venturing onto the hills, as opposed to afterwards we would have prevented a couple of surprises!
The way onto the hills is clearly signposted from near the car park and we were soon following the route into Coire Achaladair.  The munro’s to the south and east were gradually becoming obscured but our first summit was remaining cloud free.  Perhaps this rain shadow thing was working.
Immediately to the south was Beinn an Dothaidh, where 18 months ago we had spent one of our best days in the mountains ever.  Today there was no snow, but also no people.  We didn’t see a single person from the time we left to car until we returned nearly 8 hours later.
The ridge to the south summit of Beinn Achaladair provided delightful walking with superb views but as we ascended the main summit slopes the cloud base suddenly dropped, the wind picked up and the rain started.  Fortunately it was on our backs so wasn’t too unpleasant.  The drop down onto Bealach an Aoghlain was entertaining in the rain and the mist but as we reached the col the clouds dispersed, not to re-appear on the summits for the rest of the day.
We carried on along the ridge to the summit of Beinn a’Chreachain. at 1081 metres the 61st highest Munro.  There were expansive views across Rannoch Moor but the wind didn’t encourage us to hand around so we quickly started our descent.  It was reasonably quick and easy going but we made one slight mistake when we crossed a stile, it would have been better to stay on the outside of the fenced area.
We could see the farm track on the other side of the railway line and the river and assumed that we would be soon striding out towards the car.  As we only read the up to date infomation on walkhighlands on our return the lack of a bridge came as a complete surprise.  It was a great opportunity to practice our river crossing technique but it could be a serious obstacle after heavy rain or during the winter months.
A great day out, with a couple of new Munro’s and a few surprises along the way.  We walked 13.7 miles (22 kilometres) and climbed 4352 feet (1326 metres), which was further and higher than mentioned in our guidebooks, not that we are complaining.

Mountains
Looking north along the ridge towards Beinn a’Chreachain. The cloud level was about to drop and the rain start.
Summit
Nicky heading up the summit slopes of Beinn a’Chreachain. The steep descent from Beinn Achaladair is visible behind.
Cairn
Nicky on the summit of Beinn a”Chreachain. The rain had passed but the wind continued.
Mountain view
Looking across Rannoch Moor from close to the summit of Beinn a’Chreachain
Corrie and loch
If you are not certain, just take a photograph with Viewranger, it will give you the name and distance.
Crossing a stream
Nicky crossing the Water of Tulla. The lack of a bridge came as a bit of a surprise.