Sea Kayak Symposiums of the Past

Whilst continue to look through my old slide collection I came across a number of photographs, which help to illustrate what informative and entertaining events the Jersey Sea Kayak Symposiums have been over the years.  In addition they have attracted a number of paddlers who are well known throughout the sea kayaking world.
The next Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be held in May 2019, it should have been May 2018 but the organisers of the Scottish Symposium asked if they could use the slot and we readily agreed.

Symposium
1992 was the year of the first Symposium, attracting about 60 participants. Unusual sessions include this one being run by Dave Collins, who became better know through his work with UK Athletics. Also in the picture are Kevin Danforth, at the time editor of Canoe Focus and Martin Melling who was Secretary of the BCU Sea Touring Committe at the time (I think).
Symposium
The social side has always been important, the 1992 BBQ. The person in the blue sweatshirt is my dad (Ray Mansell) who was Chairman of the Jersey Canoe Club at the time. This picture was taken outside the Club cottage at Egypt on the north coast of the Island
Symposium
In 1994 we were fortunate enough to have French paddler Didier Plouhinec talking about Greenland paddling. At the time it hadn’t really been seen that frequently in the UK.
Symposium
Based at the Canoe Club premises launching was sometimes a problem when the wind was in the east. Monday in 1994 was borderline, for some people, particularly if you had a composite kayak.
Symposium
The weather had been kinder earlier in the weekend. Derek Hairon is running a towing session, off the same slip. Peter Midwood is one of the paddlers observing.
Symposium
Rolling sessions have always been popular, they remain so to this day. This is rolling 1994 style with Graham Wardle.
Symposium
By 1996 we had a swimming pool for the Greenland session but still didn’t have enough kayaks and paddles to go around. Gordon Brown is demonstrating the techniques whilst world authority, John Heath gave a running commentary. We were really fortunate to have two such icons of the sea kayaking world.
Symposium
Gordon setting up for another roll.
Symposium
1996 was the third Symposium and Derek Hutchinson had been to all three. His on water sessions were always popular but it was his talks which were the most memorable. Anybody who heard his North Sea Crossing talk will never forget it.
Symposium
Graham Wardle and Donald Thompson clearly discussing the finer points of a particular stroke, outside the clubhouse of Jersey Canoe Club.
Symposium
Cliff jumping has always been a popular Jersey sport. Here is Barry Howell jumping off the Paternosters. Derek Hutchinson is the paddler.
Symposium
1996 was the year that we finished the event with a sea kayak slalom. Possibly the only slalom ever held when every entrant was in a Skerry.
Symposium
Pete Scott ran a sea anchor session, the first time it appeared on the programme in Jersey.
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Howard Jeffs discussing paddling with Terry Harlow from the United States.
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The 4th Symposium was 1998 and were fortunate to have Bill Oddie as our personal guide on the sea birds paddle. I paddled him around in a double Spud which proved to be ideal for the task.
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Gordon Brown was back, in 1998, and here he is working on a small wooden kayak which had been designed by Duncan Winning. It was completed over the period of the Symposium. In following events Duncan stuck to making Greenland paddles as they take less time.
Symposium
The event has always attracted coaches who have been able to offer something different. Mike McClure from Northern Ireland has been a popular and regular contributor.
Symposium
As well as visiting coaches local paddlers have also worked on many sessions. Nick Queree is running a navigation session in 2002.
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Chris Jones is running a rolling session in 2006, as popular then as it was 12 years earlier.
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In 2008 the BBQ was still going strong on the Monday night, prior to the start of the extended paddling programme. Now the Monday night is the Symposium meal with the BBQ normally on the Thursday.
Symposium
One of the most popular paddles in the following week is always the day trip to the Ecrehous. In 2010 on at least one day we had great weather.

The 2019 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be the 13th time that the event has been held over a period of 27 years and it all came about after Bill Small and Pete Scott had attended the Anglesey Symposium in 1991 and decided that Jersey Canoe Club could do something similar.

Some paddles in the United States

These are some further images of kayaking in the 1990’s which, I have scanned in from some of the thousands slides I accumulated over about 35 years.  These are a selection taken in the United States in the mid 1990’s.  Sea kayaking on the west coast and canoeing in the north east.  Some great memories.

United States
One of the real highlights was a couple of visits to the Port Townsend Symposium in Washington. At the time I had organized a couple of Symposiums in Jersey and was just stunned by the scale of the event. This was the view of the waterfront in 1996.
United States
In contrast to the Sympoiums in Europe, where there were numerous small classes, with paddlers being coached on the water things were different at Port Townsend. Here Nigel Foster is running a skills session, what is not shown is the crowd of approximately 100 spectators, Nigel was the only person on the water.
United States
Sea kayaking legend Derek Hutchinson, just completing one of his sessions. A couple of days later we spent a memorable few hours sailing to Vancouver Island, where we were both heading.  When Derek passed away in 2012 he warranted an obituary in the New York Times.
United States
The classic image of Easyrider kayaks. A similar photograph was used as the advert for a number of years in, the sadly missed, Sea Kayaker Magazine.
United States
There was some “interesting” developments. The white canister on the front deck was called the “Rolling Aid”. Capsize, pull the lever and it explodes in a rather large air bag which it is possible to push up on. It was a great demo and certainly drew the crowds, but I am not sure how useful it would be in a difficult situation, it might be easier and cheaper to learn to roll with a paddle.
United States
As we had young children but wanted to continue with multi-day paddling trips we went canoeing. Not really something that we could do in Jersey, so for a number of years we went to Maine and paddled some of the rivers in the northern part of the State.
United States
There were plenty of new techniques to learn, such as portaging. This is the path around Allagash Falls in the north of Maine. I have run this river several times but the last time was too long ago.
United States
One of the camp sites on the West Branch of the Penobscot. They were clearings cut out of the dense forest allowing easy egress from the river. A couple of tables, fire pit, somewhere to tie the tarp etc.
United States
Little did we realize what we were experiencing here. This was our first ever paddle on a sit on top. Nicky is on Megunticook Lake in Maine in 1995. For many involved in kayaking this was to be the future and the sit on top has changed the face of paddlesport for many people.

Spanish Sea Kayak Symposium

One of the highlights of my year was a visit to the Spanish Symposium, a sea kayaking event, which is held in the small town of Llanca, just south of the Spanish – French border.  It was something we had thought of attending several times over the years but 2017 was the first time that it really possible, and we weren’t disappointed.  A more friendly, well organized event would be hard to find.

Spanish Symposium
The beach at Llanca was the focus for the first 3 day’s of activities.

The format was very simple but very effective.  Virtually everybody camped in the grounds of the local secondary school, we did have to wait for the end of term before putting the tents up.  Every morning members of the local kayak Club prepared a superb breakfast, which was always delivered with a smile.
The first 3 days of the event were based off the beach in Llanca, every morning several hundred paddlers would gather on the beach looking for coloured signs, which represented the various workshops.  From what initially appeared like chaos, emerged order and a variety of sessions, which were all well received.  Despite the variety of nationalities attending there always seemed to be a way of communicating, although my French was tested at times!
Following the 3 days of workshops there were 4 days of paddling when we were able to explore the surprisingly spectacular coastline of the Costa Brava.

Spanish Symposium
One of a number of spectacular physical features along this section of coast.
Spanish Symposium
I was surprised by the height of the cliffs in places. Although not vertical they certainly weren’t climbable.
Spanish Symposium
Cliffs, clear water and very few landing places combine to produce memorable kayaking.

The final day was particularly memorable as we headed north across the border to the French border town of Cerbere.  We took advantage of the ice cream shops and I reflected on the fact that a few months earlier I had arrived in this town on my bike, having riding across France from Jersey over 2 weeks last September.
The Spanish Symposium was a memorable week, the organization was smooth and the members of Club who volunteered their were incredibly friendly.  An event of this size makes considerable demands on the resources of a kayaking Club so it is not an annual event but start planning for the 2019 Spanish Sea Kayaking Symposium, you won’t be disappointed if you manage to get a place.