Jersey Symposium

It is amazing that the Scottish Symposium has hardly finished and already our thoughts are turning to events 12 months from now.  Unfortunately arranging a sea kayaking event in a popular tourist venue is a bit like arranging a wedding.  All the best locations get booked really early.  So this is the first official announcement of the 2019 Jersey Symposium.
It will start on the Friday evening, 24th May 2019, and will run will the normal format.  This is Saturday, Sunday and Monday workshops and paddles followed by 4 days of the extended paddling programme.  Most evenings there is some form of organised activity, which ranges from the Keynote lecture, a sea kayaking quiz, BBQ in a historic fort and live music, just for starters.
We are hoping that, as usual it will attract kayakers from a wide range of European countries and further afield.  Ensuring a true international mix of coaches and participants.
Jersey has a significant tidal range ensuring that there is plenty of opportunity for playing in tidal races, but the event is about so much more than rough water. Kayak handing skills, practical workshops, cliff jumping, open crossings are all topics that will be included in the final programme.
If you are interested in pre-registering for the Jersey Symposium please complete the form below, the first newsletter will be going out later in the summer.

Jersey Symposium
Just down the road from where the Symposium is based is this iconic lighthouse. Corbiere.
Jersey Symposium
There is plenty of kayaking available around the south coast, passing a number of historical buildings.
Jersey Symposium
The refs of the south east corner are a unique marine environment and well worth exploring by kayak.
Jersey Symposium
It is amazing what you might come across at lunch time. These German guns were thrown over the cliffs at the end of the Second World War.
Jersey Symposium
Fancy something a bit more challenging, a trip to the Ecrehous is an essential paddle.

 

Scottish Symposium

Well the Scottish Symposium has been and gone, all that remains is the extended paddling programme.  Two things set this event from the others, firstly it is the last one in its present format and secondly the unbelievable weather.
I travelled north in the expectation that I would be delivering a range of talks, including such diverse topics as Expedition Planning, Baja and Thirds, Twelfths and 50/90’s.  As it turned out the weather was superb and in reality who would want to sit in a classroom listening to somebody ramble on about sea kayaking when they could be out on the water experiencing, first hand the impact of a Scottish heat wave.
Nearly 200 people attended the final Scottish Symposium, in its current form.  The programme was the usual diverse mix of workshops, talks and paddles, delivered by some of Britain’s most experienced coaches.  Fortunately common sense broke out among the participants and pretty much everybody went on the water with virtually every classroom session cancelled.
The key note lecture on Saturday evening, delivered by Gordon Brown and was very much in the form of a tribute to our friend Duncan Winning, who sadly passed away earlier this year.  He was one of the most influential sea kayakers of the 20th Century as well being a vital cog in the machinery of the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.  His presence at the event was sorely missed.
As the Symposium drew to a close, after a weekend of perfect weather and the extended paddling programme started you couldn’t help but think that Duncan would have been with pleased with the way the weekend had evolved.

Scottish Symposium
Nicky outside the Gaelic College, wearing her Moderate Becoming Good Later T shirt. Our nephew was starting his journey around the Shipping Forecast areas that day.
Scottish Symposium
A really unusual picture. Nicky and Gordon tucking into ice creams at Armadale. Almost unheard of at any of the previous symposiums.
Scottish Symposium
A group on a day trip around the Point of Sleat heading south in front of the College. Just a stunning backdrop.
Scottish Symposium
A busy Greenland Rolling session at Armadale. With the weather rolling was a pretty popular option.

Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium

Over 6 weeks has passed since my incident in Gozo, which resulted in a ruptured achilles, I still have my leg in plaster and at times feel frustrated by my inability to get out on the water.
This weekend I had arranged an Advanced Sea Kayak Leader training course with paddlers visiting the Island from both the UK and France to take part.  I was really looking forward to working with Olly Sanders, but it was not to be last weekend.  I was fortunate enough to be able to arrange for Calum McKerral to fly down from Scotland and cover me at the last minute.
I was able to spend some of the evening preparing for the Scottish Se Kayak Symposium, which starts this Friday evening on the Isle of Skye.  Having attended them all since 1995 it is an event, which holds great memories for me.  Some fantastic paddles, inspirational talks and great social evenings over the last 20 plus years.
As this is due to be the last one it was an event I was particularly looking forward to attending and to do some more paddling in Scottish waters.  In fact the plan was to remain in Scotland for a further week and to paddle around the Small Isles, with some of the other members of the Jersey Canoe Club.
With my leg still in plaster flying isn’t an option so Nicky and myself leave this evening on the ferry, to start the long journey north, taking slightly longer than normal as we are stopping off in Bristol to see Joan Baez in concert, on her farewell tour.
Instead of being out on the water this weekend with the Advanced Sea Kayak Leader Training, it has largely been spent inside the house preparing my talks for next weekend.  I might not be able to paddle but at least I will be able to contribute to the lecture programme.
So it has been time spent re-acquainting myself with PowerPoint and searching through external hard drives for that one photo, which I feel might make all the difference but in reality won’t have an impact at all.
So talks on Expedition Planning, the weather, tidal planning, 12ths,3rds and 50/90, Baja and sea kayaking in the Mediterranean have gradually taken shape.  Although there is still plenty of work to do before I am satisfied with the finished product.
Fingers crossed that I don’t have to deliver all of the talks.  If there is good weather on Skye next weekend people attending the Symposium should be out on the water, experiencing all that the island has to offer.  Far more enjoyable than hearing me ramble on about Proxigean Tides or the Coriolis Force, with the occasional pretty picture of kayaking thrown in for good measure.  That said if the wind blows, the rain falls and people feel the need to shelter from the worst of the Scottish weather I will be ready to go.
Whatever happens next I know that next weekend on Skye there is going to be a great sea kayaking event with plenty of paddlers having a great time.  I hope to see some of you there.

Symposium
Taken in the 1990’s these are just a selection of the kayaks lined up on the beach on Cumbrae.
Symposium
A helicopter demonstration in 2005. It was great fun being blown around by the down draught from the rotor blades.
Symposium
The extended programme in the week after the Symposium has always been enjoyable and at times experienced some great weather. Looking towards the Cuillins, on a day trip from Elgol. Always a favourite.
Symposium
Another day trip from Elgol, when the weather wasn’t so kind. Howard Jeffs on Soay, close to the basking shark factory.

Site Updates

Those of you who read my previous post will know that I damaged my Achilles heal, last week, whilst kayaking on Gozo.  So here are a few ideas about possible site updates.
The following few days was a time of new experiences for me. I had never been put in plaster before, I had never been put in one of those lorries where the cab extends vertically alongside and aircraft, so unscathed you can be wheel chaired onto the plane. I had never traveled through an airport on one of those beeping trucks and I have never had to undergo a course of daily injections last nearly six weeks.
Having arrived back in Jersey I have had time to reflect on the experiences of the last few days. Firstly the medical attention that I have received both in Gozo and Jersey has been excellent. On both islands I was seen promptly by medical staff, including orthopaedic consultants.
Secondly whilst traveling, everything was smooth and timely at Malta, Gatwick and Jersey Airports plus on the British Airways flights. Care and attention from staff in all locations was great and fully appreciated.
I have started to develop a greater understanding of the challenges facing people living with a physical disability. I had to wait in a toilet in Malta as it was too difficult to open the door whilst on crutches. Many thanks to the anonymous Good Samaritan who came to my assistance.
In terms of missed opportunities I am disappointed that I won’t be able attend the French Sea Kayak Symposium, which starts on the 21st April. In addition I won’t be able to assist at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium, starting on the 25th May. Although it is far enough away that I will hopefully be able to travel to Scotland for the weekend and experience some of what is sure to be a superb event. I have been involved with the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium since the early 1990’s and it would be disappointing not to be able to attend the last one. Even if it is the role of honorary coffee drinker as opposed to active paddler.
In 1983, on my way to a sea kayaking trip in Svalbard, I flew over a spectacular archipelago, which I promised myself to visit one day. After 35 years of waiting this summer was the year I was going to finally get to paddle in the Lofoten’s. Sadly a destination that will have to wait for another year.
All disappointing but it is important to maintain some perspective, it is only an injury, I will get better and other opportunities will come my way.  So facing several months of inactivity it is an opportunity for some new challenges.
I will be able to make sure the Jersey Canoe Club mega SUP racing in conjunction with Absolute Adventures is organised and runs smoothly, although no active participation for me this year.
Later on in the year I will have time to complete my Greenland Paddle.  At the moment I can’t put any weight on my leg and I haven’t learnt “woodwork for sitting down” so that will have to wait until my leg strengthens as the summer progresses.  It should be complete for the autumn so that I can then work on my Greenland rolling.
One of the things that I have planned are a number of site updates, including completing a number of the Sea Kayaking Guides, which I have started including the one on Jersey.  So plenty to do but the main aim for the next few weeks is to keep my plaster dry!

Site updates
Mega SUP racing at St Brelade’s with the Jersey Canoe Club and Absolute Adventures.
Site updates
The view from the Gaelic College at the 2007 Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
Paddling into towards Loch Coruisk on one of those perfect Scottish days.
Site Updates
One of the many French Lighthouses, which are close to the base of the French Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
An on going project, my evolving Greenland paddle.

Duncan Winning

On Thursday morning we received a telephone call from Gordon Brown with the very sad news of the passing of Duncan Winning.  Duncan was an immensely influential figure in the  world of sea kayaking but more importantly he was an incredibly generous individual and thoroughly decent person.
I first met Duncan in May 1992, when he attended the first Jersey Sea Kayaking Symposium, and was one of only two people from off the island who attended every one.  Always willing to give his time and energy to ensuring that the event was a success.
Douglas Wilcox has written eloquently about Duncan and some of their shared experiences on his blog and I would recommend that you read his post.
There is very little that I could add except to mention two things, firstly Duncan did achieve some form of local fame in 1999, when he was able to paddle through the centre of his home town of Largs, due to flooding.  Secondly in 1998 at the Jersey Symposium he built a junior sea kayak from wood, the Jersey Junior, over the course of 3 days.  A beautiful kayak, which is still treasured by my family.
I last saw Duncan in January when Nicky and myself called in to see Duncan and went out for lunch at the local restaurant.  Although he was quite at times the passion that he had for kayaking still shone through with that glint in his eye.
After lunch we sat looking across to Cumbrae, talking about the great times we had on the island in the 1990’s at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposiums.  Duncan said that he wouldn’t be able to attend the event this year but we did make tentative arrangements to call in and see whilst traveling to the event from Jersey, sadly that is not to be.
I feel fortunate to have known Duncan Winning for over 25 years, spending many happy days on the water with him both in Jersey and Scotland.  He will be sadly missed, not just by his family but by the wider kayaking community.

Duncan Winning
Duncan paddling away from Loch Coruisk, Skye in perfect conditions. June 2009, just after the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Duncan Winning
Lisa in her Jersey Junior at Archirondel, in the week following the 1998 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium
Duncan Winning
Duncan relaxing after lunch in Loch Coruisk, underneath the inevitable umbrella.

French Sea Kayak Symposium

The French Sea Kayak Symposium is being held, in April 2018, on the north Brittany coast. close to Paimpol and Ile de Brehat, which is a superb kayaking area.  It follows the format, which many Symposium’s use, 3 days of workshops and an extended paddling programme for a further 4 days.
There are a number of experienced coaches from 6 European countries, who will be helping to deliver the sessions.  If you have only attended Symposiums in the UK, many may be unfamiliar names, but all are experienced and passionate about various aspects of sea kayaking.
Why not consider the French Sea Kayak Symposium in your paddling plans for 2018, you are guaranteed a friendly Breton welcome and some of the finest sea kayaking available anywhere.  There is further information on the kayaking opportunities around Ile de Brehat here.

There are a number of options available, which are inclusive of camping:
• Pack 1 – Symposium and paddling week: 250 €
• Pack 2 – Symposium: 130 €
• Pack 3 – Paddling Week: 120 €
• Pack 4 – Symposium + EPP Level 3: 330 €

EPP is the Euro Paddle Pass Level 3 ( which is equivalent to the British Canoeing 3 Star Award).

Bookings for the Symposium can be made here.

Symposium
The lighthouse is on the northern tip of Ile de Brehat. Anybody visiting this area should aim to circumnavigate the island.
French Symposium
Another classic French lighthouse. La Croix is to the south west of Ile de Brehat.
French Symposium
On the western side of Ile de Brehat is a restored tidal mill, which it is possible to paddle up to, towards high water.
French Symposium
To the south of Paimpol is L’Ost Pic.

Sea Kayak Symposiums of the Past

Whilst continue to look through my old slide collection I came across a number of photographs, which help to illustrate what informative and entertaining events the Jersey Sea Kayak Symposiums have been over the years.  In addition they have attracted a number of paddlers who are well known throughout the sea kayaking world.
The next Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be held in May 2019, it should have been May 2018 but the organisers of the Scottish Symposium asked if they could use the slot and we readily agreed.

Symposium
1992 was the year of the first Symposium, attracting about 60 participants. Unusual sessions include this one being run by Dave Collins, who became better know through his work with UK Athletics. Also in the picture are Kevin Danforth, at the time editor of Canoe Focus and Martin Melling who was Secretary of the BCU Sea Touring Committe at the time (I think).
Symposium
The social side has always been important, the 1992 BBQ. The person in the blue sweatshirt is my dad (Ray Mansell) who was Chairman of the Jersey Canoe Club at the time. This picture was taken outside the Club cottage at Egypt on the north coast of the Island
Symposium
In 1994 we were fortunate enough to have French paddler Didier Plouhinec talking about Greenland paddling. At the time it hadn’t really been seen that frequently in the UK.
Symposium
Based at the Canoe Club premises launching was sometimes a problem when the wind was in the east. Monday in 1994 was borderline, for some people, particularly if you had a composite kayak.
Symposium
The weather had been kinder earlier in the weekend. Derek Hairon is running a towing session, off the same slip. Peter Midwood is one of the paddlers observing.
Symposium
Rolling sessions have always been popular, they remain so to this day. This is rolling 1994 style with Graham Wardle.
Symposium
By 1996 we had a swimming pool for the Greenland session but still didn’t have enough kayaks and paddles to go around. Gordon Brown is demonstrating the techniques whilst world authority, John Heath gave a running commentary. We were really fortunate to have two such icons of the sea kayaking world.
Symposium
Gordon setting up for another roll.
Symposium
1996 was the third Symposium and Derek Hutchinson had been to all three. His on water sessions were always popular but it was his talks which were the most memorable. Anybody who heard his North Sea Crossing talk will never forget it.
Symposium
Graham Wardle and Donald Thompson clearly discussing the finer points of a particular stroke, outside the clubhouse of Jersey Canoe Club.
Symposium
Cliff jumping has always been a popular Jersey sport. Here is Barry Howell jumping off the Paternosters. Derek Hutchinson is the paddler.
Symposium
1996 was the year that we finished the event with a sea kayak slalom. Possibly the only slalom ever held when every entrant was in a Skerry.
Symposium
Pete Scott ran a sea anchor session, the first time it appeared on the programme in Jersey.
Symposium

Howard Jeffs discussing paddling with Terry Harlow from the United States.
Symposium
The 4th Symposium was 1998 and were fortunate to have Bill Oddie as our personal guide on the sea birds paddle. I paddled him around in a double Spud which proved to be ideal for the task.
Symposium
Gordon Brown was back, in 1998, and here he is working on a small wooden kayak which had been designed by Duncan Winning. It was completed over the period of the Symposium. In following events Duncan stuck to making Greenland paddles as they take less time.
Symposium
The event has always attracted coaches who have been able to offer something different. Mike McClure from Northern Ireland has been a popular and regular contributor.
Symposium
As well as visiting coaches local paddlers have also worked on many sessions. Nick Queree is running a navigation session in 2002.
Symposium
Chris Jones is running a rolling session in 2006, as popular then as it was 12 years earlier.
Symposium
In 2008 the BBQ was still going strong on the Monday night, prior to the start of the extended paddling programme. Now the Monday night is the Symposium meal with the BBQ normally on the Thursday.
Symposium
One of the most popular paddles in the following week is always the day trip to the Ecrehous. In 2010 on at least one day we had great weather.

The 2019 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be the 13th time that the event has been held over a period of 27 years and it all came about after Bill Small and Pete Scott had attended the Anglesey Symposium in 1991 and decided that Jersey Canoe Club could do something similar.

Some paddles in the United States

These are some further images of kayaking in the 1990’s which, I have scanned in from some of the thousands slides I accumulated over about 35 years.  These are a selection taken in the United States in the mid 1990’s.  Sea kayaking on the west coast and canoeing in the north east.  Some great memories.

United States
One of the real highlights was a couple of visits to the Port Townsend Symposium in Washington. At the time I had organized a couple of Symposiums in Jersey and was just stunned by the scale of the event. This was the view of the waterfront in 1996.
United States
In contrast to the Sympoiums in Europe, where there were numerous small classes, with paddlers being coached on the water things were different at Port Townsend. Here Nigel Foster is running a skills session, what is not shown is the crowd of approximately 100 spectators, Nigel was the only person on the water.
United States
Sea kayaking legend Derek Hutchinson, just completing one of his sessions. A couple of days later we spent a memorable few hours sailing to Vancouver Island, where we were both heading.  When Derek passed away in 2012 he warranted an obituary in the New York Times.
United States
The classic image of Easyrider kayaks. A similar photograph was used as the advert for a number of years in, the sadly missed, Sea Kayaker Magazine.
United States
There was some “interesting” developments. The white canister on the front deck was called the “Rolling Aid”. Capsize, pull the lever and it explodes in a rather large air bag which it is possible to push up on. It was a great demo and certainly drew the crowds, but I am not sure how useful it would be in a difficult situation, it might be easier and cheaper to learn to roll with a paddle.
United States
As we had young children but wanted to continue with multi-day paddling trips we went canoeing. Not really something that we could do in Jersey, so for a number of years we went to Maine and paddled some of the rivers in the northern part of the State.
United States
There were plenty of new techniques to learn, such as portaging. This is the path around Allagash Falls in the north of Maine. I have run this river several times but the last time was too long ago.
United States
One of the camp sites on the West Branch of the Penobscot. They were clearings cut out of the dense forest allowing easy egress from the river. A couple of tables, fire pit, somewhere to tie the tarp etc.
United States
Little did we realize what we were experiencing here. This was our first ever paddle on a sit on top. Nicky is on Megunticook Lake in Maine in 1995. For many involved in kayaking this was to be the future and the sit on top has changed the face of paddlesport for many people.

Spanish Sea Kayak Symposium

One of the highlights of my year was a visit to the Spanish Symposium, a sea kayaking event, which is held in the small town of Llanca, just south of the Spanish – French border.  It was something we had thought of attending several times over the years but 2017 was the first time that it really possible, and we weren’t disappointed.  A more friendly, well organized event would be hard to find.

Spanish Symposium
The beach at Llanca was the focus for the first 3 day’s of activities.

The format was very simple but very effective.  Virtually everybody camped in the grounds of the local secondary school, we did have to wait for the end of term before putting the tents up.  Every morning members of the local kayak Club prepared a superb breakfast, which was always delivered with a smile.
The first 3 days of the event were based off the beach in Llanca, every morning several hundred paddlers would gather on the beach looking for coloured signs, which represented the various workshops.  From what initially appeared like chaos, emerged order and a variety of sessions, which were all well received.  Despite the variety of nationalities attending there always seemed to be a way of communicating, although my French was tested at times!
Following the 3 days of workshops there were 4 days of paddling when we were able to explore the surprisingly spectacular coastline of the Costa Brava.

Spanish Symposium
One of a number of spectacular physical features along this section of coast.
Spanish Symposium
I was surprised by the height of the cliffs in places. Although not vertical they certainly weren’t climbable.
Spanish Symposium
Cliffs, clear water and very few landing places combine to produce memorable kayaking.

The final day was particularly memorable as we headed north across the border to the French border town of Cerbere.  We took advantage of the ice cream shops and I reflected on the fact that a few months earlier I had arrived in this town on my bike, having riding across France from Jersey over 2 weeks last September.
The Spanish Symposium was a memorable week, the organization was smooth and the members of Club who volunteered their were incredibly friendly.  An event of this size makes considerable demands on the resources of a kayaking Club so it is not an annual event but start planning for the 2019 Spanish Sea Kayaking Symposium, you won’t be disappointed if you manage to get a place.