Nordkapp Meet continued

After the fascinating talk by Sam Cook the Nordkapp meet continued on the Sunday in less than perfect weather.  Bouley Bay was our venue of choice as it offered the best chance of protection from the southerly winds, which were forecast to increase to force 7.
Initially the winds were light and we were able to explore the headlands between Bouley Bay and Bonne Nuit, which are the highest in Jersey.  Clouds were clearly building from the south and the wind increasing towards the forecast force 6 to 7.  Certainly the paddle back into Bouley Bay was what could be described as entertaining.
Although we had hoped for a day trip when we planned the Nordkapp weekend, the reality was the morning paddle on the Sunday was the best that could be hoped for in the conditions.
Monday morning dawned brighter and slightly calmer so we were able to plan a day trip from the Jersey Canoe Club premises at St Catherine’s.  Around the north east corner of the island and along the north coast, before hitching a ride back on the first of the flooding tide.
It was amazing over these two days to see such a variety of Nordkapp sea kayaks on the water, performing perfectly in the environment they were designed to operate in.  In the mid 1970’s Frank Goodman designed a sea kayak, with significant input from paddlers such as Sam Cook in particular.
The first kayak was produced in February 1975 and in the following 43 years it has maintained its position at the forefront of sea kayaking expeditions.  Last weekend was a celebration of the Nordkapp and in many ways the early years of the Jersey Canoe Club.
Paddling Nordkapp’s members of the Club completed the first circumnavigation of Ireland, a circumnavigation of the Outer Hebrides, the west coast of Spitsbergen and our own Nordkapp expedition to name just a few.  This was in addition to ground breaking exploration of the Channel Island waters by sea kayaks.
Members of the Club continue to paddle at a high standard in a range of geographical locations but these trips are no longer the preserve of the Nordkapp alone.  Times have changed but we still maintain our respect for this iconic sea kayak, which has contributed so much to the history of modern sea kayaking.

Nordkapp meet continued
Heading east around Belle Hougue. We were sheltered from the wind but from the clouds it was clear that things were going to get lively.
Norkapp meet continued
Arriving back in Bouley Bay on the Sunday morning. Fort Leicester, visible above the bow of the kayak, was rebuilt in 1836 and is available for rent from Jersey Heritage.
Nordkapp meet continued.
Monday’s lunch spot was taken on a small beach just to the west of Vicard Point. The small Canoe Club cottage at Egypt is visible at the foot of the cliffs across the bay.
Nordkapp weekend continued
On the return paddle to St Catherine’s we stopped off to play in the tide race at Tour de Rozel. An exciting way to finish a superb weekend.

Nordkapp meet

The Jersey Canoe Club Nordkapp meet got under way on Friday evening with a small reception and a photo opportunity at the Club premises at St Catherine’s.
There were 22 Nordkapp’s on showing, varying not just in model type but also in age. The oldest was an orange and white Nordkapp HM, which had been produced before the introduction of recessed deck fittings. This probably dates it to about 1977.  The most recent kayak was a Nordkapp Forti, which was available for people to try.
The evening was an opportunity to look at kayaks, chat with friends about paddling and to meet Sam Cook, our weekend guest.  In addition planning the paddle for Saturday, from Ouaisne around Corbiere and into the reefs near La Rocco Tower.
On the Saturday we were able to show Sam some of the most interesting paddling in Jersey waters, granite cliffs, tide races and lighthouses, offshore reefs and North Atlantic swells.  A perfect backdrop to our Nordkapp meet.  It was just amazing to see so many of the classic kayaks out on the water at the same time.
On Saturday evening Sam gave a talk on the 1975 Nordkapp expedition, which was fascinating.  So many things that we take for granted came about as a result of that innovative trip:
Hatches
Bulkheads
Pumps
Buoyancy aids (PFD’s) with pockets
Asymmetric paddle blades
It was a truly ground breaking expedition, which set the scene for so many more which followed.  Without the Norkapp meet people would have not had the opportunity to experience and learn what an influence this sea kayak has had on modern paddling.  There was still two days of paddling to go!

Nordkapp Weekend
22 Nordkapp’s lined up in front of the Jersey Canoe Club at St Catherines. Quite a sight.
Nordkapp weekend
22 Nordkapp’s on the beach on Saturday morning, at Ouaisne. These were not all the same kayaks that were lined up the evening before, in addition there were 3 left on roof racks. So we had over 30 different Nordkapp’s in total.
Nordkapp weekend
Rafted up in front of the cliffs at Beauport. Part of a great day on the water.
Corbiere
Paddling past Corbiere, the south west corner of Jersey. An iconic kayak in front of a classic lighthouse.
Lunch on the Saturday was amongst the reefs off the west coast of Jersey, an area which is infrequently explored by sea kayakers because of the persistent swell.
Nordkapp
It is not that often that you see so many Nordkapp’s paddling in unison.

Ecrehous today

The Ecrehous are always special but the Ecrehous today was somewhere truly memorable.  A paddle which I am sure will remain etched on the memory of those who went, for many years.
Although it was a Monday morning and people have work commitments we still had 5 people from the Jersey Canoe Club meet at St Catherine’s for an 09.30 departure to the Ecrehous.  The ability to arrange group paddles at short notice has to be one of the major benefits of WhatsApp groups.  This was was to be my first visit to the Ecrehous since February 2018.
What started off as a relatively cloudy morning with the hint of fog gradually transformed into just a perfect day with light winds and wall to wall sunshine.  Enough of the rambling lets allow the pictures to describe the Ecrehous today.

Ecrehous today
Conditions were perfect for the paddle out, flat calm and very little tidal flow as we were neaps. The only thing missing was the sunshine.
Ecrehous today
Pete passing in front of Marmotier. There is a great bench to sit on but it is presently off limits due to nesting Common Terns and it looks like it has been a really successful breeding season.
Ecrehous today
Getting ready to depart and whilst we had been on the reef the cloud had dispersed and the scene was transformed.
Ecrehous today
Passing in front of Marmotier again. What a contrast to a couple of hours earlier.
Ecrehous today
Kate paddling through the reef in perfect conditions, the houses behind are the most northern ones on the reef.
Ecrehous today
The clarity of the water was truly exceptional as we headed through the channels and in several places were accompanied by 3 very inquisitive grey seals.
Ecrehous today
Pete just to the east of me experiencing the reef on a particularly fine day.
Ecrehous today
Kate paddling past one of the smaller rocks. Because we were on neap tides we had plenty of time to explore the reef before we had to head back to Jersey.
Ecrehous today
This just sums up the quality of the Ecrehous today!

Staff Development

Sometimes days are just so enjoyable and this was the case the other day with Absolute Adventures staff development.  We left from St Catherine’s heading west on the ebbing tide.  In virtually flat calm conditions we headed past La Coupe and Tour de Rozel.
Lunch was on a small sandy beach to the east of Bouley Bay, which is only exposed on low water spring tides.  To the west we could see the remains of the SS Ribbledale. It was wrecked on the 27th December 1926, whilst en route from London to Jersey. Parts of the boilers were clearly visible just to the west.  Further information is available here.
The plan was to return via Tour de Rozel, where we planned to play in the flood tide, as it accelerated around the headland.  We weren’t disappointed, the water was starting to move to the east and accelerating quickly as the flood tide developed.
It was just the perfect place to look at skills and to work on strokes.  I always find it such an enjoyable place to play and somewhere to practice those techniques, which are crucial  to competent kayak handling.  In terms of staff development it was perfect, challenging conditions in a safe environment, helping to ensure that those paddlers who are leading groups during the summer months have the appropriate skill level.  Combined with the superb weather it was just a perfect way to spend a day.

Staff development
Paddling west past Tour de Rozel. The race doesn’t work on the falling tide but the tidal streams increase quickly once the flood tide starts. Conditions were somewhat different when we headed east later in the day.
Staff development
It was a day of one dominant colour, blue. Conditions like this are rare.
Staff development
Heading into Bouley Bay, in search of the small sandy beach, which is exposed on low water springs. Its not always an easy beach to find.
Staff development
A beach which I have rarely stopped on for lunch. Conditions were perfect and the situation ideal for a picnic.

Fund Raising

I managed to get out the other day for a couple of hours with a young man named Samuel.  This was interesting from a couple of perspectives.  Firstly this was the first time that I had been in a closed cockpit kayak since my accident three months ago and secondly it was a chance to get on the water before Samuel’s fund raising paddle in a weeks time.

Samuel spoke to us at Christmas about undertaking a project in memory of his dad who sadly passed away last year. Whilst his dad was ill he set him self the challenge of paddling around Jersey, when he got better.  Unfortunately he never managed to complete his challenge and so Samuel has stepped forward to carry the challenge on.

He set himself a realistic fund raising target, which he has already achieved with the pledges that have come in so far but I am certain that when he completes the paddle next week, weather permitting his fund raising total will increase significantly.

At the moment the forecast for next week, although I know it is some time away, is pretty reasonable so we are prettyy optimistic that we will complete the paddle as arranged.  If not there are plenty more opportunities before the end of the summer.

There is no doubt in my mind that he will achieve, what is a very worthwhile project, if you would like to support Samuel he has set up a  Just Giving page.  He might up end up with a few blisters and some numbness in his legs but he will complete the 30 nautical miles, and I estimate in about 7 hours 30 minutes.

Hopefully next week I will be writing about an enjoyable and successful circumnavigation of Jersey.

Fund raising
Paddling past Mont Orgueil Castle, which towers above Gorey. This is one of the most iconic images of Jersey.
Fund raising
Arriving back at St Catherine’s Breakwater, 4 nautical miles covered. The extra 26 miles on the day will hopefully be as straightforward.

Welcome home

Going away on a kayaking trip is always enjoyable but there is always something satisfying about coming home. Perhaps it is because most times I return home it is on an aircraft, so it is a very direct transition from holiday to home.
Landing on Tuesday evening I had received my first invite to go paddling before we had arrived at the gate, the welcome vibration of a WhatsApp on the phone.  In complete contrast to the weather before I had been away and whilst I was away, the forecast for Wednesday was pretty good.  No “beast from the east” this week.
Wednesday morning dawned with light winds and cloudless skies, we were leaving from St Catherine’s, the home of the Jersey Canoe Club, and heading south towards Seymour Tower.  This isn’t a section of coast, which screams of dramatic scenery.  It is rather more gentle, with a fascinating historical background and then a unique coastal environment, which is exposed as the tide drops, particularly off the south east corner.
We headed towards Seymour Tower, which was built in 1782 in response to the invasion of Jersey by French troops in January 1781.  It is now a unique place to spend an evening, with a qualified guide from Jersey Heritage.  Lunch was a rather hurried affair as the tidal range was 9.5 metres.  Not a particularly large spring tide but we were in the third hour after high water so the water was dropping at nearly 4cm a minute.  Resulting in a potentially long walk!
Returning to St Catherine’s we meandered through the reefs towards Karame Beacon before returning north to our starting point.   It was one of those days which hints of summer, light winds, blue skies and water of a surprising clarity.
A perfect return to my Island home.

Gorey Castle
Heading south past Mont Orgueil or Gorey Castle. It is one of the finest castles to be found anywhere, occupying a dominant position on the east coast of the Island.
Seymour Tower
Less than an hour before we had paddled across these rocks. The tide drops with amazing speed in the third hour of a 35 feet high tide. I wrote about walking in this area in an earlier post.
Karame Beacon
We headed south towards Karame, easily recognized by its top mark. On the large spring tides a fast group is able to walk out to this navigation mark.
Reef paddling
Heading north through the reefs in conditions which have been incredibly rare this year. Sunshine, no wind and surprisingly good water clarity.
Heading north
Gorey Castle is visible directly in front of the kayakers whilst in the distance the long this line of St Catherine’s breakwater, our final destination, is discernable.

Jersey Canoe Club

The Jersey Canoe Club was formed towards the end of 1974, when a group of us got together.  We had been paddling for a number of years, sometimes together and at other times in our small geographic groups.  Most of us were too young to drive to be able to meet up regularly!
On August Bank Holiday 1974 we arranged a trip to the Ecrehous, a stunning beautiful reef of rocks between Jersey and France, which 44 years on is still my favourite one day paddle.  For the first few years the Club was homeless, meeting at Highland’s College every Sunday morning before heading off to paddle a section of Jersey’s varied coastline.  Thursday evenings during the summer months was always from St Helier Harbour, meeting at the Old Lifeboat Slip before heading off around Elizabeth Castle or the Dog’s Nest.
In the early 1980’s we found our first premises, a building behind the La Folie Inn, which we shared with a couple of other watersports clubs.  It sounded a good idea but didn’t really work out, largely because no one Club seemed to have the overall responsibility for the building.  So after a few years it fell into disuse.
Over the next few years there were a number of possible projects, at one point we had architects plans drawn up for a specific Club house at a potential site close to the water in St Helier.  Unfortunately the Club was unable to negotiate a long enough lease on the land, so that project never moved forward.
In 1991 the Jersey Canoe Club was fortunate to be offered the original lifeboat station at St Catherine’s, an opportunity which was eagerly taken up. The building was, in many ways, in the perfect location. Sheltered from the prevailing winds and because of the slipway there is relatively easy access to the water at all stages of the tide.
In the last 27 years the Club house as been used in a number of different ways. The first Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium was based there in 1992 and then every 2 years up until 2010. During those 10 events many people who are internationally known in the kayaking world used the building. People such as Derek Hutchinson, Frank Goodman, Chris Hare, Scott Cunningham, John Heath, Gordon Brown, Howard Jeffs and Duncan Winning, to name just a few.
The building has also seen numerous training and coaching weekends right up to the highest level. In the early 1990’s I was able to run a modular Level 5 Coach course, over 5 weekends and coaches who came to assist in the course included Franco Ferrero ( a Jersey boy), Graham Wardle, Kevin Danforth, Dave Collins and Dennis Ball. In addition there were numerous other training courses at all levels. Plus every Christmas Day morning hardy members of the Club with family and friends meet for the swim at 11.00, followed by mince pies and mulled wine.
This year marks the 28th year that the Club will be holding its training sessions at St Catherine’s on a Tuesday night. During that time hundreds, possibly even several thousand people have been able to enjoy sea kayaking, using the Club House as a focus for the activities. To mark this continued use it was decided to refurbish the upstairs in the expectation of encouraging even greater use by the members of the Jersey Canoe Club.
It was decided to run the Sunday morning session from St Catherine’s, not an area of the Island that we use that frequently for Sunday morning paddles in the winter.  It is 2018, so we should have known that there was going to be a gale forecast, it might just be me but this winter seems incredibly windy.  With the forecast, St Catherine’s was actually quite a sensible choice.  In addition it would be a perfect opportunity to show the Club members the improvements upstairs.
The transformation of the Club House is a result of the hard work of Janet Taylor and her efforts were really appreciated by those people who turned up, either for the paddling or for the cake and coffee afterwards.
Today was a paddle of contrasts, at times sunny and flat calm whilst at other times we were battered by hail.  All this against the historical backdrop of Jersey’s east coast.  16 members braved the conditions and we all completed 7 miles towards the British Canoeing Winter Challenge.  At the present the Jersey Canoe Club lies in second place but we have struggled to get the miles in this year because it has been so consistently windy.

Jersey Canoe Club
The front of the Club house. I am always amused that even after 20+ years the States still paint “Keep Clear for Lifeboat” outside the door.
Jersey Canoe Club
The view from outside the Club house, illustrating how the breakwater can provide shelter from the winds.
Jersey Canoe Club
Taken in September 1992. The Jersey Canoe Club had an open day to coincide with British Canoe Union’s National Canoeing Day. I think that there were 110 paddlers in the raft.
Jersey Canoe Club
Taken at the First Jersey Sea Kayaking Symposium. The person in white is Dave Collins. He used to be Performance Director at U.K. Athletics and is currently Professor at University of Central Lancashire. We tried to attract a wide range of speakers to the Symposiums, not just sea kayak coaches. Kevin Danforth is standing in white.
Jersey Canoe Club
At the 1996 Symposium we held a slalom outside the Club house, in sea kayaks. This is Donald Thomson, a well known Scottish paddler.

A few pictures from this mornings paddle.

Jersey Canoe Club
Launching at St Catherine’s. The Jersey Canoe Club premises is the closest, obvious white building. Seconds later we were in the middle of quite an intense hail storm.
Archirondel Tower was built in 1792, to help protect the Island from the French. At the time it was on a small rocky islet offshore, which was joined to the shore when the southern arm, of the now abandoned St Catherine’s Breakwater, was constructed.
Jersey Canoe Club
Yet another squall threatens to engulf Pete as we paddled from Anne Port towards Gorey.
Jersey Canoe CLub
As the next squall approached from the west we sheltered behind these rocks. The east coast of Jersey should be visible but it disappeared in a cloud of hail.
Jersey Canoe Club
From whichever direction you look Mont Orgueil is a really spectacular castle. I think that the view from offshore is always the best.
Jersey Canoe Club
Head north Mont Orgueil as the next squall approaches from the north west.

Ecrehous – First of the year

As many of you aware any visit to the Ecrehous is special and even more so if you manage to squeeze a visit in during January. At this time of the year you are virtually guaranteed to have the reef to yourself, in complete contrast to weekends in the summer, when there is virtual stream of boats heading to the Ecrehous from both Jersey and France.
Late on Thursday the forecast showed virtually no wind on the Friday morning before it started to pick up around midday from the south. In addition it was a neap tide, with low water at 09.15, perfect for a quick crossing from St Catherine’s.
An early morning start saw us heading towards Les Ecrehous , in flat calm, with the promise of some sunshine.  The sun still hadn’t risen, when we left.  The journey out was pretty simple, our crossing coincided with the low water slack.   The other advantage of crossing at low water is that the rocks stretch out towards Jersey so you actually feel that you have finished the crossing sooner.
As we expected we were the only people on the reef, we landed on the French side of the reef, the shingle bank is steeper on the eastern side and so it is a easier carry, today though we hardly had to move the kayaks as we weren’t planning to stay that long.  We had a bite to eat on what is probably the finest bench to be found almost anywhere, with superb views in every direction.
Within 30 minutes of landing we were preparing to launch.  The tide had already turned and the forecast from Jersey Met was for a southerly force 3-4 by midday.  We paddled up the eastern side of the reef as we want to pass to the north before catching some of the southerly tide back towards Jersey.
What was amazing was the complete change in the weather, we had been comfortable sitting on the bench admiring the distant views but within 30 minutes the sky had turned dark, Jersey’s coast was becoming less discernible and the wind was starting to freshen.  We weren’t surprised though as this was exactly what the Met Office in Jersey had forecast.
It was a fairly straightforward paddle back to St Catherine’s but as we landed the calm and blue skies of our departure were a distant memory.
It was a quick change and a retreat to the warmth of the cafe in order to savour the events of the morning.  A January visit to the Ecrehous always feels a privilege.

Ecrehous
The kayak is packed and ready for the crossing to the Ecrehous. There was clearly the possibility of some sunshine.
Ecrehous
Perfect conditions for the crossing, there was almost no tidal movement.
Ecrehous
We landed on the French side but we had to hardly move the kayaks because we were only having a short stay.
Ecrehous
Looking across the reef back towards Jersey. In the summer, there would be numerous yachts and other boats at anchor in this area.
Ecrehous
I am never bored by this view, looking north west, on low water neaps.
Ecrehous
We return to Jersey via the north of the reef, as the tidal streams had started to flow we wanted to hitch a bit of a free ride.
Paddling around the Petit Rousse. As we turned to the left (or south) our speed over the ground increased to 6 knots.
Ecrehous
As we headed the south the cloud cover increased and there were some mist and fog patches hanging around the Jersey coast. Just as Jersey Met forecast, the wind started to increase from the south.

 

Les Dirouilles

A couple of weeks off the water with a rather persistent cough and cold had been somewhat frustrating.  I had missed the kayaking opportunities and the possibility of contributing to the Jersey Canoe Club’s total towards the British Canoeing Winter Challenge.  All that came to an end today as we managed to visit Les Dirouilles.  Possibly the least visited of all the reefs, which are located in Jersey waters.
It was a reasonably late start for a winter paddle but at 11.30, we paddled around the end of St Catherine’s Breakwater and into the tidal stream, which was going to significantly assist our journey north.  Most of the time our speed over the ground was just over 5 knots.  Our destination kept disappearing from sight as the forecast fog drifted in from the west.  This was a day of limited colours, the sea and sky changing between silver and grey.  The only splashes of colour, in an otherwise muted landscape were the kayaks.
Even the birds appeared to be avoiding display of colour, there were a few Herring Gulls and Shags sitting on the rocks.  The real pleasure was to see 7, very trusting, Purple Sandpipers as we had our lunch.  No real surprise here as the swell washed reef appears to be a perfect habitat for such species.  This is partly why the area has been designated a Ramsar area.
A great paddle to Les Dirouilles, which we managed to squeeze in just before Christmas, especially after the storms of the last few weeks.

Les Dirouilles
Approaching the reef from the south. It wasn’t obvious at first where we were going to land.
Les Dirouilles
Looking towards Les Ecrehous. I have looked the opposite way nearly 200 times but this is only the second time I have landed here and looked east.
Les Dirouilles
The north coast of Jersey was shrouded in cloud for most of the day and at times disappeared almost completely.
Dirouilles
There were 9 of us from the Jersey Canoe Club who visited the reef today. A pretty good turnout for a Wednesday 5 days before Christmas.
Dirouilles
A rather unusual cloud formation over the north coast of Jersey. A quick glance would suggest cumulo-nimbus but we thought not.
Dirouilles
The six miles back to Jersey passed in just less than an hour as the flooding tide carried us towards St Catherine’s. At times it was almost like paddling on mercury.

Jersey’s North Coast with Manchester CC.

Attracting canoeing and kayaking Club’s to paddle in Jersey has always proved a challenge. The concept of flying to a weekend’s paddling has been difficult to promote, although over the years Tower Hamlets Canoe Club have become annual visitors. This year at the Spanish Sea Kayak Symposium we fell into conversation with Jim Krawiecki and suggested that a group from Manchester flew south to warmer waters and experienced some of the paddling which Jersey has to offer.
After a quick paddle along the south coast yesterday using equipment courtesy of Absolute Adventures, today’ s focus switched to the north coast of the island. Meeting at St Catherine’s, were the Jersey Canoe Club has its premises, the plan was to head west on the ebbing Spring Tide before returning back to St Catherine’s as the tide started to flood. Along the way we hoped to be able to introduce the Manchester Canoe Club members to the delights of some of the Jersey tide races.
Remaining the tidal flow during the morning, we paddled from point to point, which meant that we were a significant distance offshore. The advantage was that our speed over the ground rarely dropped below 6 knots.  St Catherine’s, La Coupe, Tour de Rozel and Belle Hougue, one point after another, passed quickly.

Jersey
Paddling around the end of St Catherine’s Breakwater, some tide was still running north, contributing to our 7 knots over the ground.
Jersey
Passing White Rock on the ebb. On the return the tidal race would be running and the water would be slightly more entertaining!
Belle Hougue
There was still some movement off Belle Hougue, our final headland before lunch at Bonne Nuit. Sark is just visible behind the paddler.

Lunch was on the beach at Bonne Nuit.  The last of the ebb tide was still flowing west when we started our return paddle so we stayed close to the shore initially, passing things that we missed whilst heading in the opposite direction.

Jersey
Remains of the ship SS Ribbledale, which was wrecked on the 27th December 1926, whilst en route from London to Jersey.  This is visible just to the east of the beach at Bouley Bay at low water on Spring Tides.
Jersey
As the tide drops some isolated beaches appear around the coast of Jersey.

Our final play of the day was in the moving water at Tour de Rozel before we jumped on the tide and hitched a free ride back to St Catherine’s.  Sprinting off La Coupe we managed to reach 8.3 knots over the ground, not a bad speed on what was supposed to be a relaxing days paddle,  introducing some of the members of Manchester Canoe Club to the variety of sea kayaking that Jersey has to offer.