Nordkapp Kayaking Meet

As virtually everybody who is reading this post is aware, the Nordkapp, is recognised as one of the finest sea kayaks ever designed. Originally it was designed, by Frank Goodman, for the 1975 expedition to the most northerly point in Norway. This was a real watershed in sea kayak expeditions, if my memory serves me correctly the expedition was serialised in the Sunday Telegraph magazine.
The Nordkapp was used on other significant kayaking trips, such as the 1977 Cape Horn expedition and Paul Caffyn’s circumnavigation of the islands of New Zealand. It wasn’t just used on trips to distant shores, in 1978 they were used by 3 members of the Jersey Canoe Club on the first circumnavigation of Ireland.
I first paddled a Nordkapp in 1977, only briefly, returning to paddle one on a far more regular basis in 1979 before finally taking the plunge and buying my own kayak in 1980, once I had a “proper job” with a regular income. I bought my second Nordkapp HM in 1985, and it is still the kayak, which I paddle on a regular basis.
Over the last few years a few people in Jersey have to appreciate the finer points of he Nordkapp and have spent time and money lovingly restoring them. Looking at the care which had gone into restoring these fine kayaks it was thought to be a pity that was an opportunity to see them on the water together. Hence the idea of a Nordkapp meet, here in Jersey, was born.
Many of you might remember the Nordkapp owners meets of the early 1980’s, arranged by Frank Goodman, and run from Nigel Dennis’s centre of Anglesey. These were to evolve into the well known Anglesey Sea Kayak Symposium.
The Jersey Canoe Club has decided, therefore, to run a Nordkapp paddling weekend at the end of August this year, to encourage paddlers to bring out their much prized kayaks.  We will welcome all variations of the classic kayak, the HM, Jubilee, LV, plastic or Forti to the Island and are hoping to encourage visitors to the island as well as local paddlers to get out on the water.
It is a very simple concept, a few paddles at a variety of levels each day and some evening entertainment, including a talk from some of the most experienced Nordkapp paddlers from over the years.  This is not a commercial event, but it has received very generous funding from the Jersey Canoe Club, so the cost is very simple.  Free to all JCC members and a cost of £25 to non members.  This covers 12 months as an overseas member of the Canoe Club and ensures that every participant is covered by the Clubs insurance.  The £25 would also allow you to return to Jersey and participate in Club sessions in the following year as well as having access to Club equipment.
If you are are interested in attending the event please send me an e mail,  so that I can contact you over the coming weeks with more information.  It would be really helpful to know what type of Nordkapp you have, or whether you are hoping to rent or borrow one, if we manage to get hold of some spare kayaks.

Plastic Nordkapp
John Crosby playing in his plastic Nordkapp, in the rocks just to the west of Bonne Nuit
Nordkapp
Alan in his Nordkapp Jubillee and Chris in his Nordkapp HS, in the run at Tour de Rozel.
Nordkapp
Paddling from St Brelade on the day that I received my new Nordkapp LV.
Nordkapp
Two classic Nordkapp HM’s on the beach at St Brelade. This will likely be one of the beaches we will leave from in August on the Nordkapp paddling weekend.

Some more nostalgia

In 1975 Colin Mortlock led a six man expedition along the arctic coast of Norway, covering over 500 miles from Bodo to Nortdkapp and slightly beyond.  Many people see this as the first modern style sea kayaking expedition, with similarities to the mountaineering developments which were taking place in the Himalaya’s.  There were significant developments in terms of equipment, not least the Nordkapp sea kayak designed by Frank Goodman but I also believe that the Wild Water 5 pocket buoyancy aid which was standard equipment for sea kayakers for years had its origin in this expedition.  It was seen as such a ground breaking trip that it was serialized in the Sunday Telegraph magazine.
I was fortunate that 11 years later in 1986 I was able to follow part of their route, from Tromso as far as Honnigsvag, a small town just past Nordkapp.  In contrast to the unsettled weather experienced by Colin Mortlock and his fellow paddlers, we were really fortunate.  For 26 days out of 28 we had light winds, higher than average temperatures and long hours of sunshine.  Evenings were frequently spent sitting around in t-shirts although we were quite a way north of the Arctic Circle.
As we passed under the cliffs of Nordkapp (307 metres or 1,007 feet) in flat calm conditions it was hard not to think of the sailors who had traveled these waters as part of the Arctic Convoys which were heading too and from the northern ports in the former Soviet Union during the Second World War.This was a memorable trip with other members of the Jersey Canoe Club, we were fortunate with the weather, which we took full advantage of.
Next summer we are returning to northern Norway to paddle in the Lofotens, a stunning sea kayaking destination, which I have only ever seen before from an aircraft whilst heading further north.  It promises to be a good summer.

Nordkapp
Crossing to the Lyngen Peninsula, the tip of which is at 70 degrees north. This was a spectacular area and we were blessed with superb weather. One morning it was so hot we went swimming.
Nordkapp
The island of Fugloy towards midnight. I always said that one day I would return to paddle to this spectacular island. 26 years on it is an ambition which is still waiting to be achieved.
Nordkapp
Paddling into Lyngen Fjord.  At the time this was probably the most spectacular are I had ever been kayaking.
Nordkapp
Most of the time we were blessed with settled warm weather. In 4 weeks we only lost two days paddling to poor weather, and they were consecutive days, when we were close to Oksfjord.
Nordkapp
We woke one morning to particularly settled weather and seized our opportunity to paddle around the most northerly point of Europe. Nicky and myself approaching Nordkapp, in our Nordkapps.

Polishing your kayak

This is an updated version of an article I wrote in 2005 regarding the use of shoe polish to improve the look of my 1980’s vintage Nordkapp HM.

Polishing your Kayak
 Always one for the soft touch as I walked around the London Boat Show I was convinced, along with a couple of companions, that I really needed some leather balsam for protecting my shoes.  I parted with my £10.00 and walked on my way.  Some time later I stumbled across some fibre glass polish, now this was interesting as my 20 year old Nordkapp was starting to show its age.  Whereas £10 seemed a huge amount for shoe polish I was far more willing to part with £40 to protect my beloved sea kayak.
I returned home with two types of polish with the aim of writing a review of the one for fibre glass.  I followed the instructions and sat back to review my handy work.  With my hand on my heart I felt unable to write a review as I didn’t want you, dear reader, to make the same mistake as me and part with their hard earned cash.  The fibre glass polish was really disappointing.
Each week I used the leather balsam on my shoes never realizing that I held in my hand the key to restoring my kayak to some of its former glory.  That is until Chris said, “Have you tried the shoe polish on your kayak?”  Somewhat sceptically I applied the polish, it was quick and easy to do and the impact was amazing.  Almost instantly scratches appeared to disappear and the colours were restored.

Polish

A photograph taken in 2005, which clearly illustrates the difference an application of         Renapur polish can make to the appearance of a kayak.

Once the kayak was on the water the droplets glistened in the sunlight, it was just like paddling a new kayak.  The great thing is that it only takes a matter of minutes to re-apply the polish, therefore it can be repeated on a regular basis ensuring that your precious kayak maintains its perfect looks.

Kayak polish

Paddling around Nordkapp in August 1986. At this point the kayak was just over 12 months old. There has been a lot of water under the hull since then.

Kayak Polish

The Nordkapp on a beach in Greenland in 1993, still looking pretty good.

Polish

The freshly polished front deck. Unfortunately it wasn’t sunny, if it had been the water droplets would be sparkling.  This was taken today returning to Jersey from the Ecrehous.

The product is “Renapur Leather Balsam”.  Forget your shoes apply it to your kayak!

Contact www.renapur.com for further details.