John Muir Award

Today was just a perfect day spent on the cliffs near Corbiere, with a local primary school. It was the first day of the John Muir Award, which I think is just a great way of involving people of all ages in exploring and helping to improve their local environment. I was fortunate enough to be able to introduce the Award as part of my work for about 18 months but now I am retired I seem to have lost the opportunity to be involved in this worthwhile project. So when a opportunity arose for some voluntary work in conjunction with Absolute Adventures, I jumped at the chance.
Each Award involves four separate challenges, Discover, Explore, Conserve and Share. To achieve the Discovery Award, the first Level, participants must commit for at least 4 days ( or time equivalent). There are two higher levels, which longer time commitments. Upon completion of each Level the participants receive really attractive certificate.
The John Muir Trust was formed in 1983 with their mission to “To conserve and protect wild places with their indigenous animals, plants and soils for the benefit of present and future generations”.  The John Muir Award was launched on the 26th February 1997, from its base in Scotland and has now spread throughout the UK.  As it approaches its 21st birthday around 300,000 Awards have been presented.  Representing a significant involvement by a large number of people in environmental projects.
Our “little” project was to explore the headlands between Corbiere and Pt La Moye whilst removing some of the hottentot fig, an invasive species, which is taking over the cliffs and killing the natural vegetation.  Although the headlands have a wild and natural feel to them there is some fascinating industrial archaeology, the remnants of the active quarrying industry, which actually only finished in 1957.
After the storms at the start of the year today was just a perfect day to be on the cliffs, non stop sunshine and warm enough not to need a coat whilst pulling up the hottentot fig.  I am always amazed how enthusiastic the young people are and how they wish to become involved.  I feel certain that if we asked them to pull up weeds in somebodies back garden we would get a far less positive response.
Buzzards soaring overhead, a peregrine hunting along the edge of the cliff and fishing boats offshore provided a perfect backdrop to the days activities.  Next week we continue with the hottentot fig clearance before using kelly kettles to produce hot chocolate on the cliffs and heading out for lunch at the world’s most beautiful lighthouse!  Not that I am biased.  The John Muir Award really is great way to encourage people of all ages to engage with their local environment.

John Muir Award
This was the sight which greeted up this morning on arrival at Corbiere. Delightful winter sunshine and a serious North Atlantic swell breaking on the outer reefs.
John Muir Award
Part of the history of the area. Built by the Germans in the Second World War this iconic building is now available for rent from Jersey Heritage.
John Muir Award
The small bay to the west of Corbiere is La Rosiere. The remains of a couple of quarries are clearly visible as is the footpath leading round to a feature which is known both as the Smugglers Cave or Pirates Cave. We weren’t able to enter the cave today because of the swell but did reach a point where we could look in.
John Muir Award
A couple hours of clearing hottentot fig produced this significant pile. Pretty good for primary school children.