Nordkapp Meet Update

As mentioned previously, the Jersey Canoe Club is running a Nordkapp sea kayaking weekend in August.  Starting the evening of Friday 24th August, followed by 3 days of paddles in the waters around Jersey.
There will be paddles at a variety of levels with hopefully the opportunity to visit some of the offshore reefs which surround Jersey, including the Ecrehous and the Paternosters.  Over the course of the weekend the tides increase in size, on the Monday evening we have a spring tide of 10.63 metres, meaning that a number of the tide races which develop around Jersey will be working, offering great entertainment for kayakers of all levels.
The weekend is free to members of the Jersey Canoe Club or £25 for non members of the Club.  This is the cost of 12 months overseas membership of the Club and it ensures that everybody has insurance cover over the weekend.  All in all an absolute bargain.
The Saturday evening talk is by the legendary Sam Cook, who was on the original sea kayaking expedition to Nordkapp in 1975.  This was a truly ground breaking expedition for British sea kayakers and was a route that was largely followed by a group of paddlers from the Jersey Canoe Club in 1986.
This is not going to be a huge event, we will be really pleased if we get 30 people on the water in a variety of different Nordkapps.  As well as people from Jersey we have had enquiries from the UK, Switzerland, France and Guernsey.

This picture was taken in 1979, just to the south of Gorey, when it seemed that you could have almost any colour of Nordkapp HM, as long as it was orange.  I think that the one red one is being held by Franco Ferrero from Pesda Press.

Nordkapp
The summer of 1986 and a young Mr and Mrs Mansell just about to go around Nordkapp in their Nordkapp HM’s.  This was on the Jersey Canoe Club trip of that summer.
If you would like, more information on what is going to be a relaxed but enjoyable weekend of kayaking, in all varieties of Nordkapp sea kayaks, please complete the form below.

Contact

Site Updates

Those of you who read my previous post will know that I damaged my Achilles heal, last week, whilst kayaking on Gozo.  So here are a few ideas about possible site updates.
The following few days was a time of new experiences for me. I had never been put in plaster before, I had never been put in one of those lorries where the cab extends vertically alongside and aircraft, so unscathed you can be wheel chaired onto the plane. I had never traveled through an airport on one of those beeping trucks and I have never had to undergo a course of daily injections last nearly six weeks.
Having arrived back in Jersey I have had time to reflect on the experiences of the last few days. Firstly the medical attention that I have received both in Gozo and Jersey has been excellent. On both islands I was seen promptly by medical staff, including orthopaedic consultants.
Secondly whilst traveling, everything was smooth and timely at Malta, Gatwick and Jersey Airports plus on the British Airways flights. Care and attention from staff in all locations was great and fully appreciated.
I have started to develop a greater understanding of the challenges facing people living with a physical disability. I had to wait in a toilet in Malta as it was too difficult to open the door whilst on crutches. Many thanks to the anonymous Good Samaritan who came to my assistance.
In terms of missed opportunities I am disappointed that I won’t be able attend the French Sea Kayak Symposium, which starts on the 21st April. In addition I won’t be able to assist at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium, starting on the 25th May. Although it is far enough away that I will hopefully be able to travel to Scotland for the weekend and experience some of what is sure to be a superb event. I have been involved with the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium since the early 1990’s and it would be disappointing not to be able to attend the last one. Even if it is the role of honorary coffee drinker as opposed to active paddler.
In 1983, on my way to a sea kayaking trip in Svalbard, I flew over a spectacular archipelago, which I promised myself to visit one day. After 35 years of waiting this summer was the year I was going to finally get to paddle in the Lofoten’s. Sadly a destination that will have to wait for another year.
All disappointing but it is important to maintain some perspective, it is only an injury, I will get better and other opportunities will come my way.  So facing several months of inactivity it is an opportunity for some new challenges.
I will be able to make sure the Jersey Canoe Club mega SUP racing in conjunction with Absolute Adventures is organised and runs smoothly, although no active participation for me this year.
Later on in the year I will have time to complete my Greenland Paddle.  At the moment I can’t put any weight on my leg and I haven’t learnt “woodwork for sitting down” so that will have to wait until my leg strengthens as the summer progresses.  It should be complete for the autumn so that I can then work on my Greenland rolling.
One of the things that I have planned are a number of site updates, including completing a number of the Sea Kayaking Guides, which I have started including the one on Jersey.  So plenty to do but the main aim for the next few weeks is to keep my plaster dry!

Site updates
Mega SUP racing at St Brelade’s with the Jersey Canoe Club and Absolute Adventures.
Site updates
The view from the Gaelic College at the 2007 Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
Paddling into towards Loch Coruisk on one of those perfect Scottish days.
Site Updates
One of the many French Lighthouses, which are close to the base of the French Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
An on going project, my evolving Greenland paddle.

Duncan Winning

On Thursday morning we received a telephone call from Gordon Brown with the very sad news of the passing of Duncan Winning.  Duncan was an immensely influential figure in the  world of sea kayaking but more importantly he was an incredibly generous individual and thoroughly decent person.
I first met Duncan in May 1992, when he attended the first Jersey Sea Kayaking Symposium, and was one of only two people from off the island who attended every one.  Always willing to give his time and energy to ensuring that the event was a success.
Douglas Wilcox has written eloquently about Duncan and some of their shared experiences on his blog and I would recommend that you read his post.
There is very little that I could add except to mention two things, firstly Duncan did achieve some form of local fame in 1999, when he was able to paddle through the centre of his home town of Largs, due to flooding.  Secondly in 1998 at the Jersey Symposium he built a junior sea kayak from wood, the Jersey Junior, over the course of 3 days.  A beautiful kayak, which is still treasured by my family.
I last saw Duncan in January when Nicky and myself called in to see Duncan and went out for lunch at the local restaurant.  Although he was quite at times the passion that he had for kayaking still shone through with that glint in his eye.
After lunch we sat looking across to Cumbrae, talking about the great times we had on the island in the 1990’s at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposiums.  Duncan said that he wouldn’t be able to attend the event this year but we did make tentative arrangements to call in and see whilst traveling to the event from Jersey, sadly that is not to be.
I feel fortunate to have known Duncan Winning for over 25 years, spending many happy days on the water with him both in Jersey and Scotland.  He will be sadly missed, not just by his family but by the wider kayaking community.

Duncan Winning
Duncan paddling away from Loch Coruisk, Skye in perfect conditions. June 2009, just after the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Duncan Winning
Lisa in her Jersey Junior at Archirondel, in the week following the 1998 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium
Duncan Winning
Duncan relaxing after lunch in Loch Coruisk, underneath the inevitable umbrella.

First coasteering session

If there was any evidence needed that this winter the weather has been far more unsettled than last year it might be, that today was my first coasteering session of the year.  Yet last winter we were out virtually every Friday coasteering.  Jumping, swimming and scrambling our way around the coast.
I am almost embarrassed to admit but I am not certain that I have left from Fliquet before on any form of activity, although I have passed the area hundreds, if not thousands of times before.  It was clear that I was going to exploring some new territory and I wasn’t disappointed.  An enjoyable day and an encouraging start to coasteering in 2018.

Friday coasteering
Preparing in the car park at Fliquet. The Jersey Tower behind is one of the earliest on the Island and was built before 1787.
Friday coasteering
Heading north along the short section of the east coast before we turned west.
Friday coasteering
One of the fascinating aspects of coasteering is discovering some unique features. Coming across this wall we stood there thinking who built this wall and why? Today there was no obvious reason why anybody would have committed so much time and energy to build a wall here.
Friday coasteering
After the rather large and unexplained large wall we came across this small and unexplained feature. It appears that somebody has concreted a step on this section of the coast. We did appreciate it as it enabled us to cross this gap with relative ease.
Friday coasteering
The rock type on the north east corner of the island is Rozel Conglomerate. It is a very weak rock and will readily break when too much pressure is applied with either your foot or hand. It was a really enjoyable morning but give me granite any day for coasteering.
Friday coasteering
We could have swam this section but there had been quite a few long swims already so we thought some short scrambling would be a bit more entertaining.
Friday coasteering
The end is in sight. Rozel beckons.

Jersey Canoe Club

The Jersey Canoe Club was formed towards the end of 1974, when a group of us got together.  We had been paddling for a number of years, sometimes together and at other times in our small geographic groups.  Most of us were too young to drive to be able to meet up regularly!
On August Bank Holiday 1974 we arranged a trip to the Ecrehous, a stunning beautiful reef of rocks between Jersey and France, which 44 years on is still my favourite one day paddle.  For the first few years the Club was homeless, meeting at Highland’s College every Sunday morning before heading off to paddle a section of Jersey’s varied coastline.  Thursday evenings during the summer months was always from St Helier Harbour, meeting at the Old Lifeboat Slip before heading off around Elizabeth Castle or the Dog’s Nest.
In the early 1980’s we found our first premises, a building behind the La Folie Inn, which we shared with a couple of other watersports clubs.  It sounded a good idea but didn’t really work out, largely because no one Club seemed to have the overall responsibility for the building.  So after a few years it fell into disuse.
Over the next few years there were a number of possible projects, at one point we had architects plans drawn up for a specific Club house at a potential site close to the water in St Helier.  Unfortunately the Club was unable to negotiate a long enough lease on the land, so that project never moved forward.
In 1991 the Jersey Canoe Club was fortunate to be offered the original lifeboat station at St Catherine’s, an opportunity which was eagerly taken up. The building was, in many ways, in the perfect location. Sheltered from the prevailing winds and because of the slipway there is relatively easy access to the water at all stages of the tide.
In the last 27 years the Club house as been used in a number of different ways. The first Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium was based there in 1992 and then every 2 years up until 2010. During those 10 events many people who are internationally known in the kayaking world used the building. People such as Derek Hutchinson, Frank Goodman, Chris Hare, Scott Cunningham, John Heath, Gordon Brown, Howard Jeffs and Duncan Winning, to name just a few.
The building has also seen numerous training and coaching weekends right up to the highest level. In the early 1990’s I was able to run a modular Level 5 Coach course, over 5 weekends and coaches who came to assist in the course included Franco Ferrero ( a Jersey boy), Graham Wardle, Kevin Danforth, Dave Collins and Dennis Ball. In addition there were numerous other training courses at all levels. Plus every Christmas Day morning hardy members of the Club with family and friends meet for the swim at 11.00, followed by mince pies and mulled wine.
This year marks the 28th year that the Club will be holding its training sessions at St Catherine’s on a Tuesday night. During that time hundreds, possibly even several thousand people have been able to enjoy sea kayaking, using the Club House as a focus for the activities. To mark this continued use it was decided to refurbish the upstairs in the expectation of encouraging even greater use by the members of the Jersey Canoe Club.
It was decided to run the Sunday morning session from St Catherine’s, not an area of the Island that we use that frequently for Sunday morning paddles in the winter.  It is 2018, so we should have known that there was going to be a gale forecast, it might just be me but this winter seems incredibly windy.  With the forecast, St Catherine’s was actually quite a sensible choice.  In addition it would be a perfect opportunity to show the Club members the improvements upstairs.
The transformation of the Club House is a result of the hard work of Janet Taylor and her efforts were really appreciated by those people who turned up, either for the paddling or for the cake and coffee afterwards.
Today was a paddle of contrasts, at times sunny and flat calm whilst at other times we were battered by hail.  All this against the historical backdrop of Jersey’s east coast.  16 members braved the conditions and we all completed 7 miles towards the British Canoeing Winter Challenge.  At the present the Jersey Canoe Club lies in second place but we have struggled to get the miles in this year because it has been so consistently windy.

Jersey Canoe Club
The front of the Club house. I am always amused that even after 20+ years the States still paint “Keep Clear for Lifeboat” outside the door.
Jersey Canoe Club
The view from outside the Club house, illustrating how the breakwater can provide shelter from the winds.
Jersey Canoe Club
Taken in September 1992. The Jersey Canoe Club had an open day to coincide with British Canoe Union’s National Canoeing Day. I think that there were 110 paddlers in the raft.
Jersey Canoe Club
Taken at the First Jersey Sea Kayaking Symposium. The person in white is Dave Collins. He used to be Performance Director at U.K. Athletics and is currently Professor at University of Central Lancashire. We tried to attract a wide range of speakers to the Symposiums, not just sea kayak coaches. Kevin Danforth is standing in white.
Jersey Canoe Club
At the 1996 Symposium we held a slalom outside the Club house, in sea kayaks. This is Donald Thomson, a well known Scottish paddler.

A few pictures from this mornings paddle.

Jersey Canoe Club
Launching at St Catherine’s. The Jersey Canoe Club premises is the closest, obvious white building. Seconds later we were in the middle of quite an intense hail storm.
Archirondel Tower was built in 1792, to help protect the Island from the French. At the time it was on a small rocky islet offshore, which was joined to the shore when the southern arm, of the now abandoned St Catherine’s Breakwater, was constructed.
Jersey Canoe Club
Yet another squall threatens to engulf Pete as we paddled from Anne Port towards Gorey.
Jersey Canoe CLub
As the next squall approached from the west we sheltered behind these rocks. The east coast of Jersey should be visible but it disappeared in a cloud of hail.
Jersey Canoe Club
From whichever direction you look Mont Orgueil is a really spectacular castle. I think that the view from offshore is always the best.
Jersey Canoe Club
Head north Mont Orgueil as the next squall approaches from the north west.

February Sunshine

For what seemed like the first time in months the Sunday morning session of the Jersey Canoe Club took place in some bright February sunshine, although the temperature was modified by the strong north easterly wind.  11 of us paddled out from St Brelade’s heading towards Corbiere, the granite cliffs looking particularly stunning.
Although Corbiere was our destination, as we approached the south west corner it was clear that with the amount of water moving, due to the Spring tides, and the westerly swell, that we might need to cut our journey short.  We didn’t really want an unplanned journey to Sark.
Close to the causeway, at Corbiere, a plaque commemorates the attempts of Peter Edwin Larbalestier, an assistant keeper of the lighthouse, who was drowned on 28 May 1946, while trying to rescue a visitor cut off by the incoming tide, who also lost her life.  Many years ago I was landing on the slipway at Corbiere, after a Club session on a Thursday evening.  I noticed the plaque and said to one of the people who was with us, “that’s funny you have the same name as the lighthouse keeper who drowned” his reply was “that’s not surprising he was my uncle and I am named after him”.
In the Corbiere Phare Restaurant there is a photograph of Peter Edwin Larbalestier, in his lighthouse keepers uniform.  The likeness to Peter Larbalestier is really quite amazing.  Sadly Peter from the Canoe Club passed away a few years ago but every time we look at the photograph of his uncle we are reminded of the good times we had with Peter kayaking.
The paddle back to St Brelade’s against the wind and tide was a bit challenging in places but that was largely irrelevant as we enjoyed our first sunny Sunday morning paddle of 2018.

February Sunshine
Looking east along St Brelade’s Bay. An hour after high water.
St Brelade's Church
Looking towards St Brelade’s Church, which must be it the best position of any of the island’s parish churches. There is evidence that parts of the church were here before 1035. To the left of the main church is the Fisherman’s Chapel.
Beauport
Approaching Beauport, once inside the bay we gained some shelter from the strong north easterly wind. Contrast this with the views of Beauport earlier in the week
February Sunshine
Once past the Grosse Tete you become more exposed to any westerly swell. There was a few feet of swell today plus plenty of water movement due to the 11 metre tide.
February Sunshine
Corbiere lighthouse in sight. The lighthouse must been the most photographed site on the Island.
February sunshine
Rachel close to the point where we turned back. Due to the size of the tide there was a large amount of water running past the point and when combined with the swell it was creating conditions, which were possibly a bit too entertaining for the Canoe Club Sunday morning session.
February Sunshine
Returning to St Brelade’s Bay, it was a rather windy as we paddled through the gap but it marked the end of an enjoyable couple of hours in the February sunshine.

South West Corner

For what seems like the first time in months we were able to have our midweek kayaking day trip off the south west corner of the Island. There have been numerous strong wind warnings this year, issued by Jersey Met, most of them appearing to involve some south westerly involvement. The consequence of this is that day trips, along the south coast have been few and far between recently.  Fortunately today’s forecast allowed us the paddle from Belcroute to Corbiere and return.

Weather forecast
Wind warning number 101 of the year, issued at 02.47 on the 31st January, an indication of just how unsettled the beginning of 2018 has been.

It was just a few hardy members of the Jersey Canoe Club who congregated at Belcroute on Tuesday morning. Many of the regular attendees of the mid week day trip were off Island or unavailable this week. The aim was to use the last of the ebb as it flowed west, towards Corbiere, with the added assistance of the light north easterly wind. Amazingly as the tide turned and the east flowing stream started the wind also went around to the south west. It’s not often that you get both wind and tide with in both directions on a day trip. We were certainly getting our monies worth from environmental factors.
From Belcroute it was an easy run south to Noirmont Point, clearly identified by its black and white, early 19th century military tower.  Although it wasn’t easily visible today because of the low cloud/fog.  We used the last couple of hours of the tidal flow  to assist our run towards Corbiere.  This section of coast has to be one of my favourite lengths of the islands coastline, it is where I gained my original kayaking experience, starting in 1969.
It is normally a blaze of colour, the blue sea, red granite and green vegetation complementing each other but today the overwhelming colour was grey.
It was just a delight to be on the water without having to battle wind and waves, which have been our constant companions for the last few months.  Corbiere was our turning point, the iconic lighthouse was first lit on the 24th April 1874 and over the years has been the scene of a number of dramatic rescues.
Lunch was on the small beach below the Highlands Hotel, before we took advantage of the easterly flowing tide and south westerly wind to assist our return.  Overall we paddled just over 11 miles each, assisting Jersey Canoe Club’s entry into the British Canoeing Winter Challenge.  Taking the Clubs combined mileage  since the 1st December to just over 2,000 miles, a significant total considering the weather and the fact that because of geography we are limited to paddling on the sea.
I have written more information on the route between Belcroute and Corbiere elsewhere on the SeaPaddler site, so take a look for further ideas on places to paddle.

Belcroute to Corbiere
Launching from a rather foggy Belcroute. St Aubin’s Fort, the islands outdoor centre, is barely visible.
Belcroute to Noirmont.
Approaching Noirmont from the north. At this point we had the tide helping us reach 5 knots. The tower was built between 1810 and 1814, to help protect the Island in case of invasion by the French.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Approaching Pt La Moye from the east. Potato fields, covered in plastic, to encourage early season growth are just visible on the slopes.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Approaching Corbiere, the lighthouse is virtually invisible.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Even when relatively close the lighthouse was barely visible.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Nicky heading past Beauport, one of the most attractive bays on the Island but today it looked rather grey.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Adam heading past Pt Le Fret, one of the most dramatic headlands on the island, which is normally exposed to swell.
Belcroute to Corbiere
Nicky heading towards Pt Le Fret.

Nordkapp Kayaking Meet

As virtually everybody who is reading this post is aware, the Nordkapp, is recognised as one of the finest sea kayaks ever designed. Originally it was designed, by Frank Goodman, for the 1975 expedition to the most northerly point in Norway. This was a real watershed in sea kayak expeditions, if my memory serves me correctly the expedition was serialised in the Sunday Telegraph magazine.
The Nordkapp was used on other significant kayaking trips, such as the 1977 Cape Horn expedition and Paul Caffyn’s circumnavigation of the islands of New Zealand. It wasn’t just used on trips to distant shores, in 1978 they were used by 3 members of the Jersey Canoe Club on the first circumnavigation of Ireland.
I first paddled a Nordkapp in 1977, only briefly, returning to paddle one on a far more regular basis in 1979 before finally taking the plunge and buying my own kayak in 1980, once I had a “proper job” with a regular income. I bought my second Nordkapp HM in 1985, and it is still the kayak, which I paddle on a regular basis.
Over the last few years a few people in Jersey have to appreciate the finer points of he Nordkapp and have spent time and money lovingly restoring them. Looking at the care which had gone into restoring these fine kayaks it was thought to be a pity that was an opportunity to see them on the water together. Hence the idea of a Nordkapp meet, here in Jersey, was born.
Many of you might remember the Nordkapp owners meets of the early 1980’s, arranged by Frank Goodman, and run from Nigel Dennis’s centre of Anglesey. These were to evolve into the well known Anglesey Sea Kayak Symposium.
The Jersey Canoe Club has decided, therefore, to run a Nordkapp paddling weekend at the end of August this year, to encourage paddlers to bring out their much prized kayaks.  We will welcome all variations of the classic kayak, the HM, Jubilee, LV, plastic or Forti to the Island and are hoping to encourage visitors to the island as well as local paddlers to get out on the water.
It is a very simple concept, a few paddles at a variety of levels each day and some evening entertainment, including a talk from some of the most experienced Nordkapp paddlers from over the years.  This is not a commercial event, but it has received very generous funding from the Jersey Canoe Club, so the cost is very simple.  Free to all JCC members and a cost of £25 to non members.  This covers 12 months as an overseas member of the Canoe Club and ensures that every participant is covered by the Clubs insurance.  The £25 would also allow you to return to Jersey and participate in Club sessions in the following year as well as having access to Club equipment.
We are fortunate enough to be able to confirm that the Saturday evening talk will be given by Sam Cook who was on the original Nordkapp expedition in 1975.  This is a great opportunity to hear a talk by one of the icons of sea kayaking in the 20th century.  A couple of years later he went on what was possibly the first kayaking expedition to Svalbard, where, once again they used the Nordkapp.
If you are are interested in attending the event please send me an e mail,  so that I can contact you over the coming weeks with more information.  It would be really helpful to know what type of Nordkapp you have, or whether you are hoping to rent or borrow one, if we manage to get hold of some spare kayaks.

Plastic Nordkapp
John Crosby playing in his plastic Nordkapp, in the rocks just to the west of Bonne Nuit
Nordkapp
Alan in his Nordkapp Jubillee and Chris in his Nordkapp HS, in the run at Tour de Rozel.
Nordkapp
Paddling from St Brelade on the day that I received my new Nordkapp LV.
Nordkapp
Two classic Nordkapp HM’s on the beach at St Brelade. This will likely be one of the beaches we will leave from in August on the Nordkapp paddling weekend.

Svalbard

We have just a lovely couple of days, (not weather wise) in Brecon at the 60th birthday party of somebody I paddled with in Svalbard, way back in 1983.  We spent two months kayaking the west coast of Spitsbergen, a more detailed account of which is available here.
As far as we are aware we were possibly the first sea kayaking expedition that used dry suits whilst on the water.  It really was a time of discovery, the rumour was that you would be inverted and drown if you had to capsize your kayak whilst wearing a dry suit.  There is a brief description of our experiments and how fortunate I was to survive!
Dave has reached to grand old age of 60 and so on Saturday, Phil, Pete, Dave and myself were together for possibly the first time in 30 years.  The last time we could remember all being together was at Dave’s wedding in 1988.
Spending two months together kayaking in the Arctic can pose significant challenges to relationships but 35 years on ours seem to have survived and although we don’t see each other that often, it is amazing how comfortable we are in each others company.  The shared experiences of 35 years ago continue to bind us together into a tight knit group.
If you are planning a kayaking trip this summer try to reflect on what impact the journey will have on your relationships and hopefully in 35 years time you will still experience the same empathy between the members of the group.  The success of sea kayaking trips can be measured in so many more ways than nautical miles paddled.

Svalbard
Our first paddle turned into an 18 nautical mile crossing of Isfjorden, made slightly more challenging by the ice in front of the kayaks
Svalbard
Heading south after rounding the north westerly point of Svalbard.
Svalbard
In weather which was warmer but damper than we experienced in Spitsbergen we walked around the Brecon countryside following lunch

On a slightly different note one thing I have discovered this week, due to the amount of time I have spent inside, is Paddling Adventures Radio.  They have over 100 podcasts, which are perfect listening when you are in the bath.  Sean Rowley and Derek Sprecht are the two hosts, who talk about a range of paddling related activities and all in very relaxed style.  It is recommended listening.  The podcasts could be perfect for when you are in the gym.  Give it a listening and sea what you think.

Ecrehous – First of the year

As many of you aware any visit to the Ecrehous is special and even more so if you manage to squeeze a visit in during January. At this time of the year you are virtually guaranteed to have the reef to yourself, in complete contrast to weekends in the summer, when there is virtual stream of boats heading to the Ecrehous from both Jersey and France.
Late on Thursday the forecast showed virtually no wind on the Friday morning before it started to pick up around midday from the south. In addition it was a neap tide, with low water at 09.15, perfect for a quick crossing from St Catherine’s.
An early morning start saw us heading towards Les Ecrehous , in flat calm, with the promise of some sunshine.  The sun still hadn’t risen, when we left.  The journey out was pretty simple, our crossing coincided with the low water slack.   The other advantage of crossing at low water is that the rocks stretch out towards Jersey so you actually feel that you have finished the crossing sooner.
As we expected we were the only people on the reef, we landed on the French side of the reef, the shingle bank is steeper on the eastern side and so it is a easier carry, today though we hardly had to move the kayaks as we weren’t planning to stay that long.  We had a bite to eat on what is probably the finest bench to be found almost anywhere, with superb views in every direction.
Within 30 minutes of landing we were preparing to launch.  The tide had already turned and the forecast from Jersey Met was for a southerly force 3-4 by midday.  We paddled up the eastern side of the reef as we want to pass to the north before catching some of the southerly tide back towards Jersey.
What was amazing was the complete change in the weather, we had been comfortable sitting on the bench admiring the distant views but within 30 minutes the sky had turned dark, Jersey’s coast was becoming less discernible and the wind was starting to freshen.  We weren’t surprised though as this was exactly what the Met Office in Jersey had forecast.
It was a fairly straightforward paddle back to St Catherine’s but as we landed the calm and blue skies of our departure were a distant memory.
It was a quick change and a retreat to the warmth of the cafe in order to savour the events of the morning.  A January visit to the Ecrehous always feels a privilege.

Ecrehous
The kayak is packed and ready for the crossing to the Ecrehous. There was clearly the possibility of some sunshine.
Ecrehous
Perfect conditions for the crossing, there was almost no tidal movement.
Ecrehous
We landed on the French side but we had to hardly move the kayaks because we were only having a short stay.
Ecrehous
Looking across the reef back towards Jersey. In the summer, there would be numerous yachts and other boats at anchor in this area.
Ecrehous
I am never bored by this view, looking north west, on low water neaps.
Ecrehous
We return to Jersey via the north of the reef, as the tidal streams had started to flow we wanted to hitch a bit of a free ride.
Paddling around the Petit Rousse. As we turned to the left (or south) our speed over the ground increased to 6 knots.
Ecrehous
As we headed the south the cloud cover increased and there were some mist and fog patches hanging around the Jersey coast. Just as Jersey Met forecast, the wind started to increase from the south.