Round Jersey

As mentioned in an earlier post we were due to paddle around Jersey, with Samuel, to raise money in memory of his dad, who sadly passed away last year.  Well yesterday was the day, on which the round Jersey paddle was planned, but the weather decided not to co-operate fully. After days of virtually calm winds, there was the possibility of a force 4, but we were happy to give it a go.
Just after 08.00 we left St Catherine’s and headed along the north coast.  With wide and tide with us we made pretty rapid progress, averaging well over 4 knots, Samuel was in the double with Jim, whilst John and myself were in singles.  Sections of the coast, which we often spent hours exploring, slipped past quickly.  The north west corner, is a particularly spectacular section of coast but no time to appreciate today as ahead lay the broad sweep of St Ouen’s Bay, which we knew would have potential crosswinds.  The west coast wasn’t as challenging as we anticipated but as soon as we rounded Corbiere onto the south coast the headwinds kicked in.
The automatic wind broadcast from St Helier Pierheads was a pretty constant 11 knots, gusting 19 knots, although it did reach a rather inconvenient 21 knots of headwind on several occasions.  It was a matter of simply putting our heads down, and covering the 8 nautical miles, with the least amount of discomfort possible.
As we headed onto the east coast St Catherine’s Breakwater came back into view so we knew whatever happened we were going to complete the circumnavigation.  What had started as a vague plan for Samuel, at Christmas, had developed into reality.  The 29 nautical miles were much harder than we anticipated due to the level if the wind but we were greeted by an enthusiastic crowd as we reached the breakwater and Samuel had his moment in the spotlight when he was interviewed by the local television station.
Samuel set out to raise £2,250 and even before we started the paddle he had more than exceed his total, which is great news.  To find out more about Samuel’s project take a look at his Just Giving page to see how much he has currently raised.
It was a great day and as experienced sea kayakers John, Jim and myself were just amazed at the amount of effort Samuel put in on the day we paddled round Jersey.

Round Jersey
Passing Egypt, on the north coast of Jersey, not the north coast of Africa. The Canoe Club runs the a small cottage at the base of the cliffs here, a great place to stay.
Round Jersey
Wolf’s Caves between Bonne Nuit and Sorel. Making good progress along the north coast with the following wind. In a couple of places we touched 7 knots.
Round Jersey
Rounding Grosnez, the north west corner of Jersey. Spectacular cliffs but unfortunately the end of the following wind, as we headed down the west coast, it was on our side. Somewhat frustrating
Round Jersey
The south west corner of the island is marked by the lighthouse at Corbiere. It also marked the change from a following wind to a head wind. The next 8 miles were not easy.
Round Jersey
Lunch was on the beach at Portelet, we had paddled nearly 19 nautical miles so were confident that we would complete the remaining 10 miles.

Fund Raising

I managed to get out the other day for a couple of hours with a young man named Samuel.  This was interesting from a couple of perspectives.  Firstly this was the first time that I had been in a closed cockpit kayak since my accident three months ago and secondly it was a chance to get on the water before Samuel’s fund raising paddle in a weeks time.

Samuel spoke to us at Christmas about undertaking a project in memory of his dad who sadly passed away last year. Whilst his dad was ill he set him self the challenge of paddling around Jersey, when he got better.  Unfortunately he never managed to complete his challenge and so Samuel has stepped forward to carry the challenge on.

He set himself a realistic fund raising target, which he has already achieved with the pledges that have come in so far but I am certain that when he completes the paddle next week, weather permitting his fund raising total will increase significantly.

At the moment the forecast for next week, although I know it is some time away, is pretty reasonable so we are prettyy optimistic that we will complete the paddle as arranged.  If not there are plenty more opportunities before the end of the summer.

There is no doubt in my mind that he will achieve, what is a very worthwhile project, if you would like to support Samuel he has set up a  Just Giving page.  He might up end up with a few blisters and some numbness in his legs but he will complete the 30 nautical miles, and I estimate in about 7 hours 30 minutes.

Hopefully next week I will be writing about an enjoyable and successful circumnavigation of Jersey.

Fund raising
Paddling past Mont Orgueil Castle, which towers above Gorey. This is one of the most iconic images of Jersey.
Fund raising
Arriving back at St Catherine’s Breakwater, 4 nautical miles covered. The extra 26 miles on the day will hopefully be as straightforward.

Les Landes

Whenever there is a period of north easterly winds my mind immediately starts to think about sea kayaking along the cliffs of the north west corner of Jersey, particularly those around Les Landes.  Direct exposure to the North Atlantic swell means that at certain times of the year the paddling opportunities in this area are somewhat restricted, but when the swell drops, head to the north west for some of the best kayaking in Jersey.

Although Sunday morning is the usual paddling time for the Jersey Canoe Club, it seemed like too good an oppportunity to miss so we put on an extra session on Saturday morning.  We had anticipated being sheltered from the easterly wind but in reality it appeared to be following the contours of the land, resulting in almost no respite.  I suppose these things are sent to try us.

Our morning paddle actually proved to be quite entertaining.  A slight wind blown chop kept us on our toes but the lack of swell meant we were able to paddle wherever we liked.  Caves I probably hadn’t paddled into for 5 or 6 years revealed their secrets whilst we were surrounded by history.

The most recent is the evidence of 20th century German occupation, with guns at the base of the cliffs and bunkers above.  Grosnez Castle, a ruined 14th century castle, which was occupied by the French in 1373 and 1381 was visible above our most northerly point.  Whilst the oldest features were at the base of Le Pinacle, early Neolithic finds dating back to 4800BC as well as Roman from 200AD.

What is there not like about a Saturday morning with some great paddling set against a varied historical backdrop, followed by a lovely lunch at Jersey Pearl.  I can’t wait for the next lull in the North Atlantic swell.

Stinky Bay
Getting ready to leave Stinky Bay.

Les Lands

Underneath Grosnez there is this delightful circular inlet, which is normally a boiling cauldron. Today we were able to relax and enjoy the rock architecture.

La Nethe Falaise
A huge expanse of rock close to Grosnez. La Nethe Falaise, is the aptly named Black Cliff in Jersey French.
Les Landes
After the days of blue skies earlier in the week it was slightly disappointing that we had grey skies but the scenery more than made up for it.
L'Etacq
Looking back towards the cliffs at Les Landes. The tide was dropping quickly so it was important to return before the carry became impossible.

 

Bell Boats

The Bell Boat is a pretty unique paddling craft, which was designed by former Olympic racing coach David Train.  Designed as a crew boat, to encourage co-operation, the Jersey Canoe Club decided to use them as a bit of training before the September Dragon Boat Racing.
Nine metres long, with two separate hulls they can take up to 12 young people and a helm, as none of us fall in the category of young we settled on 8 adults plus myself as helm.  First introduced in 1992 we were using the Mk 3 version which has been in production since 2012.  We borrowed them from the Air Training Corps, who had purchased them with the help of a grant from the One Foundation.
It is possible to become a qualified Bell Boat Helm with a course through British Canoeing, which was a course I really enjoyed doing a couple of years ago.
Despite the relatively strong north easterly wind we were soon heading towards Beauport, mostly in rhythm with each other, direction controlled by myself as the helm.  A nine metre craft doesn’t respond immediately to the subtle changes in the helms oar.  It requires some significant planning to ensure the bell boat maintains its course, as well as some appropriately timed group co-ordination.
We followed a circular route around some of the offshore reefs before returning back to St Brelade’s.  It was a great evening and no doubt that when we have the next session in a couple of weeks time there will be enough members present to ensure that both of the bell boats can be launched resulting into some friendly racing across the bay.

Bell Boat
Paddling along the cliffs just to the west of Beauport.
Bell Boat
Peter Hargreaves on the rear left hand side. The Grosse Tete is the large rock behind, which we eventually circumnavigated.
Bell Boat
Looking towards the bow of the Bell Boat.

 

Buoyancy Aids (PFD’s) & Life Jackets

One of the pleasures of my week is listening to Paddling Adventures Radio, a podcast from Canada.  Essentially Sean Rowley and Derek Specht chat about a range of topics related to all aspects of paddle sport.  This evenings opening article on people wearing buoyancy aids (PFD’s) got me thinking.
My first buoyancy aid, which I had for Christmas at the end of the 1960’s, was filled with kapok, a vegetable material, which was used in life saving devices in the Second World War.  I feel certain that it must have been one of the last buoyancy aids to contain kapok.  Towards the end of the 1970’s, most paddlers in the UK were wearing life jackets, which met the specifications of BS 3595.  They were designed to support an unconscious person in the water, if the inherent solid buoyancy had been topped up with air.
The only disadvantage, being that they were cumbersome and seriously uncomfortable.  As a consequence many paddlers used to carry them under the rear deck elastics as opposed to wearing them on the person.  As shown by the photograph of Nicky taken off the Ecrehous, in the summer of 1979.  How that contrasts with the photograph taken last summer, off the west coast of Greenland, where everybody is properly equipped.
I can’t remember the last time I paddled to the Ecrehous, with my buoyancy aid under the deck elastics.  It must be at least 20 years ago.  Putting on a buoyancy aid is now an automatic reaction.  The last time I remember consciously not putting on my PFD was on a seriously hot, flat calm day in Baja, when I judged that I was more at risk from heat exhaustion than from an unexpected capsize.
There is no doubt that equipment has improved dramatically over the last 50 years that I have been kayaking and the current buoyancy aids are far more comfortable to wear than their predecessors.  So the best advice is to wear it.
Another point to consider is the explosion in paddle sports in recent years, it is rare to be alone on the water nowadays.  Mid week in January, on a rainy windy day doesn’t guarantee isolation in 2018.
Regularly whilst out paddling we come across paddlers, particularly on sit on tops, and it is amazing how many of those paddlers aren’t wearing buoyancy aids.  What is particularly scary is when you see 3 people, normally 2 adults and a child on a double sit on top, and none of them wearing buoyancy aids.
There are 2 potential responses, paddle over and have a friendly word, I have done this a few times as people on SOT’s have been approaching tide races, but my advice has always been ignored.  The other response is to hope that by wearing the appropriate equipment you will be a positive role model and raise people’s awareness of the need to wear buoyancy aids.

Nordkapp
Nicky off the Ecrehous, in the summer of 1979. A classic image of the time, a beautiful orange Nordkapp HM and the BS 3595 Life Jacket tucked under the rear deck elastics.
Buoyancy aids
The group from the Jersey Canoe Club in Greenland last summer. All wearing their buoyancy aids, even though the conditions were pretty benign, apart from the water temperature.

Jersey Symposium

It is amazing that the Scottish Symposium has hardly finished and already our thoughts are turning to events 12 months from now.  Unfortunately arranging a sea kayaking event in a popular tourist venue is a bit like arranging a wedding.  All the best locations get booked really early.  So this is the first official announcement of the 2019 Jersey Symposium.
It will start on the Friday evening, 24th May 2019, and will run will the normal format.  This is Saturday, Sunday and Monday workshops and paddles followed by 4 days of the extended paddling programme.  Most evenings there is some form of organised activity, which ranges from the Keynote lecture, a sea kayaking quiz, BBQ in a historic fort and live music, just for starters.
We are hoping that, as usual it will attract kayakers from a wide range of European countries and further afield.  Ensuring a true international mix of coaches and participants.
Jersey has a significant tidal range ensuring that there is plenty of opportunity for playing in tidal races, but the event is about so much more than rough water. Kayak handing skills, practical workshops, cliff jumping, open crossings are all topics that will be included in the final programme.
If you are interested in pre-registering for the Jersey Symposium please complete the form below, the first newsletter will be going out later in the summer.

Jersey Symposium
Just down the road from where the Symposium is based is this iconic lighthouse. Corbiere.
Jersey Symposium
There is plenty of kayaking available around the south coast, passing a number of historical buildings.
Jersey Symposium
The refs of the south east corner are a unique marine environment and well worth exploring by kayak.
Jersey Symposium
It is amazing what you might come across at lunch time. These German guns were thrown over the cliffs at the end of the Second World War.
Jersey Symposium
Fancy something a bit more challenging, a trip to the Ecrehous is an essential paddle.

 

Nordkapp Meet Update

As mentioned previously, the Jersey Canoe Club is running a Nordkapp sea kayaking weekend in August.  Starting the evening of Friday 24th August, followed by 3 days of paddles in the waters around Jersey.
There will be paddles at a variety of levels with hopefully the opportunity to visit some of the offshore reefs which surround Jersey, including the Ecrehous and the Paternosters.  Over the course of the weekend the tides increase in size, on the Monday evening we have a spring tide of 10.63 metres, meaning that a number of the tide races which develop around Jersey will be working, offering great entertainment for kayakers of all levels.
The weekend is free to members of the Jersey Canoe Club or £25 for non members of the Club.  This is the cost of 12 months overseas membership of the Club and it ensures that everybody has insurance cover over the weekend.  All in all an absolute bargain.
The Saturday evening talk is by the legendary Sam Cook, who was on the original sea kayaking expedition to Nordkapp in 1975.  This was a truly ground breaking expedition for British sea kayakers and was a route that was largely followed by a group of paddlers from the Jersey Canoe Club in 1986.
This is not going to be a huge event, we will be really pleased if we get 30 people on the water in a variety of different Nordkapps.  As well as people from Jersey we have had enquiries from the UK, Switzerland, France and Guernsey.

This picture was taken in 1979, just to the south of Gorey, when it seemed that you could have almost any colour of Nordkapp HM, as long as it was orange.  I think that the one red one is being held by Franco Ferrero from Pesda Press.

Nordkapp
The summer of 1986 and a young Mr and Mrs Mansell just about to go around Nordkapp in their Nordkapp HM’s.  This was on the Jersey Canoe Club trip of that summer.
If you would like, more information on what is going to be a relaxed but enjoyable weekend of kayaking, in all varieties of Nordkapp sea kayaks, please complete the form below.

Contact

Site Updates

Those of you who read my previous post will know that I damaged my Achilles heal, last week, whilst kayaking on Gozo.  So here are a few ideas about possible site updates.
The following few days was a time of new experiences for me. I had never been put in plaster before, I had never been put in one of those lorries where the cab extends vertically alongside and aircraft, so unscathed you can be wheel chaired onto the plane. I had never traveled through an airport on one of those beeping trucks and I have never had to undergo a course of daily injections last nearly six weeks.
Having arrived back in Jersey I have had time to reflect on the experiences of the last few days. Firstly the medical attention that I have received both in Gozo and Jersey has been excellent. On both islands I was seen promptly by medical staff, including orthopaedic consultants.
Secondly whilst traveling, everything was smooth and timely at Malta, Gatwick and Jersey Airports plus on the British Airways flights. Care and attention from staff in all locations was great and fully appreciated.
I have started to develop a greater understanding of the challenges facing people living with a physical disability. I had to wait in a toilet in Malta as it was too difficult to open the door whilst on crutches. Many thanks to the anonymous Good Samaritan who came to my assistance.
In terms of missed opportunities I am disappointed that I won’t be able attend the French Sea Kayak Symposium, which starts on the 21st April. In addition I won’t be able to assist at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium, starting on the 25th May. Although it is far enough away that I will hopefully be able to travel to Scotland for the weekend and experience some of what is sure to be a superb event. I have been involved with the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium since the early 1990’s and it would be disappointing not to be able to attend the last one. Even if it is the role of honorary coffee drinker as opposed to active paddler.
In 1983, on my way to a sea kayaking trip in Svalbard, I flew over a spectacular archipelago, which I promised myself to visit one day. After 35 years of waiting this summer was the year I was going to finally get to paddle in the Lofoten’s. Sadly a destination that will have to wait for another year.
All disappointing but it is important to maintain some perspective, it is only an injury, I will get better and other opportunities will come my way.  So facing several months of inactivity it is an opportunity for some new challenges.
I will be able to make sure the Jersey Canoe Club mega SUP racing in conjunction with Absolute Adventures is organised and runs smoothly, although no active participation for me this year.
Later on in the year I will have time to complete my Greenland Paddle.  At the moment I can’t put any weight on my leg and I haven’t learnt “woodwork for sitting down” so that will have to wait until my leg strengthens as the summer progresses.  It should be complete for the autumn so that I can then work on my Greenland rolling.
One of the things that I have planned are a number of site updates, including completing a number of the Sea Kayaking Guides, which I have started including the one on Jersey.  So plenty to do but the main aim for the next few weeks is to keep my plaster dry!

Site updates
Mega SUP racing at St Brelade’s with the Jersey Canoe Club and Absolute Adventures.
Site updates
The view from the Gaelic College at the 2007 Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
Paddling into towards Loch Coruisk on one of those perfect Scottish days.
Site Updates
One of the many French Lighthouses, which are close to the base of the French Sea Kayak Symposium.
Site Updates
An on going project, my evolving Greenland paddle.

Duncan Winning

On Thursday morning we received a telephone call from Gordon Brown with the very sad news of the passing of Duncan Winning.  Duncan was an immensely influential figure in the  world of sea kayaking but more importantly he was an incredibly generous individual and thoroughly decent person.
I first met Duncan in May 1992, when he attended the first Jersey Sea Kayaking Symposium, and was one of only two people from off the island who attended every one.  Always willing to give his time and energy to ensuring that the event was a success.
Douglas Wilcox has written eloquently about Duncan and some of their shared experiences on his blog and I would recommend that you read his post.
There is very little that I could add except to mention two things, firstly Duncan did achieve some form of local fame in 1999, when he was able to paddle through the centre of his home town of Largs, due to flooding.  Secondly in 1998 at the Jersey Symposium he built a junior sea kayak from wood, the Jersey Junior, over the course of 3 days.  A beautiful kayak, which is still treasured by my family.
I last saw Duncan in January when Nicky and myself called in to see Duncan and went out for lunch at the local restaurant.  Although he was quite at times the passion that he had for kayaking still shone through with that glint in his eye.
After lunch we sat looking across to Cumbrae, talking about the great times we had on the island in the 1990’s at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposiums.  Duncan said that he wouldn’t be able to attend the event this year but we did make tentative arrangements to call in and see whilst traveling to the event from Jersey, sadly that is not to be.
I feel fortunate to have known Duncan Winning for over 25 years, spending many happy days on the water with him both in Jersey and Scotland.  He will be sadly missed, not just by his family but by the wider kayaking community.

Duncan Winning
Duncan paddling away from Loch Coruisk, Skye in perfect conditions. June 2009, just after the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.
Duncan Winning
Lisa in her Jersey Junior at Archirondel, in the week following the 1998 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium
Duncan Winning
Duncan relaxing after lunch in Loch Coruisk, underneath the inevitable umbrella.

First coasteering session

If there was any evidence needed that this winter the weather has been far more unsettled than last year it might be, that today was my first coasteering session of the year.  Yet last winter we were out virtually every Friday coasteering.  Jumping, swimming and scrambling our way around the coast.
I am almost embarrassed to admit but I am not certain that I have left from Fliquet before on any form of activity, although I have passed the area hundreds, if not thousands of times before.  It was clear that I was going to exploring some new territory and I wasn’t disappointed.  An enjoyable day and an encouraging start to coasteering in 2018.

Friday coasteering
Preparing in the car park at Fliquet. The Jersey Tower behind is one of the earliest on the Island and was built before 1787.
Friday coasteering
Heading north along the short section of the east coast before we turned west.
Friday coasteering
One of the fascinating aspects of coasteering is discovering some unique features. Coming across this wall we stood there thinking who built this wall and why? Today there was no obvious reason why anybody would have committed so much time and energy to build a wall here.
Friday coasteering
After the rather large and unexplained large wall we came across this small and unexplained feature. It appears that somebody has concreted a step on this section of the coast. We did appreciate it as it enabled us to cross this gap with relative ease.
Friday coasteering
The rock type on the north east corner of the island is Rozel Conglomerate. It is a very weak rock and will readily break when too much pressure is applied with either your foot or hand. It was a really enjoyable morning but give me granite any day for coasteering.
Friday coasteering
We could have swam this section but there had been quite a few long swims already so we thought some short scrambling would be a bit more entertaining.
Friday coasteering
The end is in sight. Rozel beckons.