On the water

The opportunity to get back on the water presented itself much earlier than expected as my ruptured achilles appears to be mending quicker than anticipated.  My first excursion at sea, over the weekend, was on a sit on top as I worked out that I would be able to keep my foot straighter than in a closed cockpit boat.  In addition, if necessary it would be pretty easy to place my foot into the cooling water.
St Brelade’s was the chosen departure point and it had been some time since I had paddled there last.  The hardest part of the whole trip was probably carrying the kayak down to the waters edge as I was so apprehensive about walking and carrying on the sand, multi-tasking was a pretty new experience.  Once afloat though life became much easier and despite having relatively low aspirations we did manage to paddle all the way to Corbiere.
I have only been off the water for 3 months, which doesn’t seem too long, but flicking through my paddling log books I realized that it has been the longest time that I haven’t been paddling, since I started my log books in January 1979.
This was the first place I went kayaking, in 1969, and I still appreciate that it is a special section of coast.  In the warm June sunshine, the red granite cliffs, fringed with vegetation and the blue seas combined to produce a coastline, more reminiscent of the Mediterranean than the British Isles.  Just a great day to relaunch my kayaking career.

On the Water
Nicky and Ruth heading towards the cliffs at Beauport.
On the Water
Heading west towards Corbiere. Offshore are the Les Kaines, one of the islands small reefs.
On the Water
Just to the east of Pt La Moye. One of the most impressive things about today was the clarity of the water.
On the Water
One happy paddler and his friend!
On the Water
Looking towards Beauport, one of Jersey’s most beautiful bays. Today the only boat at anchor was an old style French sailing boat.

Achilles Rehab

5th April 2018 is etched in my memory as the day that I ruptured my Achilles’ tendon, whilst kayaking in Gozo. It has been a difficult and at times frustrating 3 months but today I felt I made a significant step forward on the road to recovery. For the first time I went to the gym.
Although I wouldn’t place myself in the category of a gym fanatic I must admit that when the opportunity arises I do enjoy spending an hour or so in the gym, listening to some music and working up a sweat on some of the cardio- vascular machines.
My machine of choice has always been the Concept 2 rowing machine, for a couple of reasons. Firstly it seems to be the most suitable machine for maintaining my kayaking fitness and secondly it seems to give you an all round work out , without any significant impact on the body.
I started off gently on the bike and then the cross trainer, all seemed to be going well. So I thought I would try the rowing machine, managed one pull before having to get off, it might be some time until I get back on the Concept 2. The long road back to fitness might be slow and bumpy.
The gym I go to, the D-W Gym, must have one of the best views of any. Looking across St Brelade’s Bay to Pt Le Fret, the scene of some great sea kayaking in the past and hopefully in the future, once my leg has recovered.
The next waymark on my route a degree of normality will be when I manage to get in a kayak, that day may still be some time off, but you never know.

Gym
The view from the bike in the gym. There can’t be many gyms, which have such a stunning view.
Gym
Looking out from the gym. Pt Le Fret is the headland in the distance, where there is some superb paddling.
Winston Churchill Park
Looking across St Brelade’s Bay from the Winston Churchill Memorial Park, it was not an easy walk through the trees, I had to stop and rest 3 times.

Jersey Kayak Guide

The updated version of my Jersey Kayak Guide is now available on the site.  Hopefully  both visiting and local kayakers will find some of the information useful.  Starting at Corbiere, the guide takes you around the island in anti clockwise direction, which just happens to be the best place to start and the preferred direction of travel if you are hoping to paddle around Jersey.
As well as information about key places to visit there is guidance on tides and areas where challenging tidal races can develop at certain stages in the tidal sequence.

Jersey Kayak Guide
At certain stages of the tide quite challenging conditions can develop off Noirmont so always plan accordingly.

Over the coming months the aim is to add further paddling guides to certain areas, which will hopefully contain useful information for people visiting areas for the first.  A guide to Belize has already been produced, and others are in the pipeline.
If they are useful please let me know.

Jersey Symposium

It is amazing that the Scottish Symposium has hardly finished and already our thoughts are turning to events 12 months from now.  Unfortunately arranging a sea kayaking event in a popular tourist venue is a bit like arranging a wedding.  All the best locations get booked really early.  So this is the first official announcement of the 2019 Jersey Symposium.
It will start on the Friday evening, 24th May 2019, and will run will the normal format.  This is Saturday, Sunday and Monday workshops and paddles followed by 4 days of the extended paddling programme.  Most evenings there is some form of organised activity, which ranges from the Keynote lecture, a sea kayaking quiz, BBQ in a historic fort and live music, just for starters.
We are hoping that, as usual it will attract kayakers from a wide range of European countries and further afield.  Ensuring a true international mix of coaches and participants.
Jersey has a significant tidal range ensuring that there is plenty of opportunity for playing in tidal races, but the event is about so much more than rough water. Kayak handing skills, practical workshops, cliff jumping, open crossings are all topics that will be included in the final programme.
If you are interested in pre-registering for the Jersey Symposium please complete the form below, the first newsletter will be going out later in the summer.

Jersey Symposium
Just down the road from where the Symposium is based is this iconic lighthouse. Corbiere.
Jersey Symposium
There is plenty of kayaking available around the south coast, passing a number of historical buildings.
Jersey Symposium
The refs of the south east corner are a unique marine environment and well worth exploring by kayak.
Jersey Symposium
It is amazing what you might come across at lunch time. These German guns were thrown over the cliffs at the end of the Second World War.
Jersey Symposium
Fancy something a bit more challenging, a trip to the Ecrehous is an essential paddle.

 

Atlantic Coastal Kayaker

The June 2018 issue of Atlantic Coastal Kayaker, a magazine published 8 times a year in Massachusetts, contains an article written by yours truly on sea kayaking in the waters around Jersey.
Each issue contains a range of articles, many not surprisingly with a focus on the sea kayaking opportunities of the north east United States but with others, which will clearly appeal to a wider audience.  This issue contains a report on an event arranged by the Chesapeake Paddlers Association, the hazards of cold water, places to launch in Massachusetts and an article on fishing, amongst others.
Subscriptions cost $24 for a year in the US or $44, for international subscriptions.  The online version is $15 a year and, in my opinion, well worth subscribing too.

Atlantic Coastal Kayaker
Front cover of the issue which contains the article on kayaking in Jersey.

Weather Forecast Update

A couple of days ago I looked at the Jersey Weather forecast, for Jersey for today, 48 hours in advance.  The differences from a number of weather sites were pretty significant.  Ranging from conditions which would have been fairly manageable for intermediate level kayakers to ones where it would have been difficult to keep the kayak on the roof of the car.
As would be expected those forecasts, which were at the upper end of the scale are indicating a significant reduction in the wind speed, whereas the Jersey Met forecast, which I find is usually the most accurate is indicating an increase as the day progresses.
I suppose the main thing to take away from this is to check the forecasts regularly, be prepared to modify your plans as the day approaches and keep an eye on any changing weather during the course of the day.

Weather forecast
Two days ago Weather Online was forecasting SW Force 7 gusting 56 mph. Today SE F5 with gusts of 37 mph. A significant reduction in the gusts.
There is a significant difference with Magic Seaweed. In particular in relation to wave height. 2 days ago 5.1 metres was forecast for 09.00 today. Today’s forecast for the same time is 1.1 metres. A difference in 4 metres in wave height would have a significant impact on kayaking conditions.
Weather forecast
Two days ago XC Weather was forecasting winds up to 45 mph, whereas today the maximum day time wind speed is 29 mph.
Weather forecast
Jersey Met was giving Southerly F4 two days ago but the forecast from this morning certainly shows an increasing wind speed. Still a F4 to start with but F7, for a while, by early afternoon.

Weather Forecast Issues

When we are considering potential kayaking trips we always keep at least one eye on the weather forecast, wondering whether we are going to get that window in the weather to allow us to do that paddle we have been thinking about for quite some time.
We are fortunate in that we are able to access a variety of forecasts, how often have you heard people say “I didn’t like that forecast so I will look for a better one”, normally they are joking but looking at the forecast for the next 48 hours in Jersey there might be some truth in that statement.
Looking at the variety of forecasts available it seems like we can expect almost anything to hit the Island.  I have taken screen shots of a number of forecasts, which were published around 09.00 this morning.

Weather Forecast
Weather Online is giving SW Force 7 with gusts to 56 mph. Not ideal for any water based activity.
Weather forecast
Magic Seaweed is similar, forecasting winds up to 57 mph and just to make matters more interesting a wave height of 5.9 metres around lunch time.
Metcheck is a little less windy but the interesting thing is that the mean wind speed is above the gusts, not the other way around, as you would expect. 39 mph but gust 31 mph. This is 20 mph less than Magic Seaweed.
Weather forecast.
I normally find XC weather pretty accurate and the forecast for Friday is 45 mph. Pretty blowy but not as windy as some of the other forecasts.
Weather forecast
Windfinder is giving 39 gusting 47 but in contrast to the other forecasts this is in knots as opposed to mph. So this forecast is giving winds of up to 54 mph.
Weather Forecast
Weather.com is predicting winds of between 25 and 35 mph from the SSW. These are pretty much the most conservative wind speeds of any of the forecasts so far.
Wunderground is giving a maximum wind speed of 27 mph. Blowy but not disastrous.
Weather forecast
Meteox is giving SW Force 8, which translates into wind gusts of 40 mph.
Weather Forecast
The Jersey Met forecast, which I normally use is showing Force 4 from the south. Nothing to really worry about.

So we have a complete range of forecasts, with one we would still be able to run a kayaking session for relatively inexperienced paddlers whereas with some others we would be tying down the garden furniture and heading out to sea would be the last thing on our mind.
This shows the need to check forecasts on a regular basis as well as maintaining a close eye on conditions whilst on the water.
It will be interesting to see what eventually arrives on Friday morning.

 

Aerial Photos

The great thing about flying is the opportunity, even on commercial passenger flights, is the opportunity to get so interesting aerial photos of some classic sea kayaking areas.  Photographs which will either re-kindle memories of great days spent on the water or stimulate thoughts of future trips.
So next time you find yourself next to the window on a flight, keep your fingers crossed for clear skies and sit back and enjoy one of the best free shows available.

Aerial photos
Take off on a clear February afternoon gave these superb views of Jersey. So many great kayaking trips are contained within this photograph, particularly the north west corner of the island.
Aerial Photos
Passing over the east coast of Greenland en route to Copenhagen. Still haven’t managed to paddle on the east coast despite plenty of visits to the west coast.
Aerial Photos
Flying back from Greenland we were fortunate enough to have really clear views of most of Iceland.
Aerial photos
Hurst Castle Spit at the western end of the Solent. Some quality paddling to the Isle of Wight and the Needles
Aerial photos
On approach to Gatwick you normally get good views of the south coast of England, including Brighton. Its been quite a few years since I last paddled off the Sussex coast.
Aerial photos
Flying south from Belize City. A fascinating stretch of coast but the better sea kayaking in Belize is offshore.

Nordkapp Meet Update

As mentioned previously, the Jersey Canoe Club is running a Nordkapp sea kayaking weekend in August.  Starting the evening of Friday 24th August, followed by 3 days of paddles in the waters around Jersey.
There will be paddles at a variety of levels with hopefully the opportunity to visit some of the offshore reefs which surround Jersey, including the Ecrehous and the Paternosters.  Over the course of the weekend the tides increase in size, on the Monday evening we have a spring tide of 10.63 metres, meaning that a number of the tide races which develop around Jersey will be working, offering great entertainment for kayakers of all levels.
The weekend is free to members of the Jersey Canoe Club or £25 for non members of the Club.  This is the cost of 12 months overseas membership of the Club and it ensures that everybody has insurance cover over the weekend.  All in all an absolute bargain.
The Saturday evening talk is by the legendary Sam Cook, who was on the original sea kayaking expedition to Nordkapp in 1975.  This was a truly ground breaking expedition for British sea kayakers and was a route that was largely followed by a group of paddlers from the Jersey Canoe Club in 1986.
This is not going to be a huge event, we will be really pleased if we get 30 people on the water in a variety of different Nordkapps.  As well as people from Jersey we have had enquiries from the UK, Switzerland, France and Guernsey.

This picture was taken in 1979, just to the south of Gorey, when it seemed that you could have almost any colour of Nordkapp HM, as long as it was orange.  I think that the one red one is being held by Franco Ferrero from Pesda Press.

Nordkapp
The summer of 1986 and a young Mr and Mrs Mansell just about to go around Nordkapp in their Nordkapp HM’s.  This was on the Jersey Canoe Club trip of that summer.
If you would like, more information on what is going to be a relaxed but enjoyable weekend of kayaking, in all varieties of Nordkapp sea kayaks, please complete the form below.

Contact

First coasteering session

If there was any evidence needed that this winter the weather has been far more unsettled than last year it might be, that today was my first coasteering session of the year.  Yet last winter we were out virtually every Friday coasteering.  Jumping, swimming and scrambling our way around the coast.
I am almost embarrassed to admit but I am not certain that I have left from Fliquet before on any form of activity, although I have passed the area hundreds, if not thousands of times before.  It was clear that I was going to exploring some new territory and I wasn’t disappointed.  An enjoyable day and an encouraging start to coasteering in 2018.

Friday coasteering
Preparing in the car park at Fliquet. The Jersey Tower behind is one of the earliest on the Island and was built before 1787.
Friday coasteering
Heading north along the short section of the east coast before we turned west.
Friday coasteering
One of the fascinating aspects of coasteering is discovering some unique features. Coming across this wall we stood there thinking who built this wall and why? Today there was no obvious reason why anybody would have committed so much time and energy to build a wall here.
Friday coasteering
After the rather large and unexplained large wall we came across this small and unexplained feature. It appears that somebody has concreted a step on this section of the coast. We did appreciate it as it enabled us to cross this gap with relative ease.
Friday coasteering
The rock type on the north east corner of the island is Rozel Conglomerate. It is a very weak rock and will readily break when too much pressure is applied with either your foot or hand. It was a really enjoyable morning but give me granite any day for coasteering.
Friday coasteering
We could have swam this section but there had been quite a few long swims already so we thought some short scrambling would be a bit more entertaining.
Friday coasteering
The end is in sight. Rozel beckons.