Ecrehous – First of the year

As many of you aware any visit to the Ecrehous is special and even more so if you manage to squeeze a visit in during January. At this time of the year you are virtually guaranteed to have the reef to yourself, in complete contrast to weekends in the summer, when there is virtual stream of boats heading to the Ecrehous from both Jersey and France.
Late on Thursday the forecast showed virtually no wind on the Friday morning before it started to pick up around midday from the south. In addition it was a neap tide, with low water at 09.15, perfect for a quick crossing from St Catherine’s.
An early morning start saw us heading towards Les Ecrehous , in flat calm, with the promise of some sunshine.  The sun still hadn’t risen, when we left.  The journey out was pretty simple, our crossing coincided with the low water slack.   The other advantage of crossing at low water is that the rocks stretch out towards Jersey so you actually feel that you have finished the crossing sooner.
As we expected we were the only people on the reef, we landed on the French side of the reef, the shingle bank is steeper on the eastern side and so it is a easier carry, today though we hardly had to move the kayaks as we weren’t planning to stay that long.  We had a bite to eat on what is probably the finest bench to be found almost anywhere, with superb views in every direction.
Within 30 minutes of landing we were preparing to launch.  The tide had already turned and the forecast from Jersey Met was for a southerly force 3-4 by midday.  We paddled up the eastern side of the reef as we want to pass to the north before catching some of the southerly tide back towards Jersey.
What was amazing was the complete change in the weather, we had been comfortable sitting on the bench admiring the distant views but within 30 minutes the sky had turned dark, Jersey’s coast was becoming less discernible and the wind was starting to freshen.  We weren’t surprised though as this was exactly what the Met Office in Jersey had forecast.
It was a fairly straightforward paddle back to St Catherine’s but as we landed the calm and blue skies of our departure were a distant memory.
It was a quick change and a retreat to the warmth of the cafe in order to savour the events of the morning.  A January visit to the Ecrehous always feels a privilege.

Ecrehous
The kayak is packed and ready for the crossing to the Ecrehous. There was clearly the possibility of some sunshine.
Ecrehous
Perfect conditions for the crossing, there was almost no tidal movement.
Ecrehous
We landed on the French side but we had to hardly move the kayaks because we were only having a short stay.
Ecrehous
Looking across the reef back towards Jersey. In the summer, there would be numerous yachts and other boats at anchor in this area.
Ecrehous
I am never bored by this view, looking north west, on low water neaps.
Ecrehous
We return to Jersey via the north of the reef, as the tidal streams had started to flow we wanted to hitch a bit of a free ride.
Paddling around the Petit Rousse. As we turned to the left (or south) our speed over the ground increased to 6 knots.
Ecrehous
As we headed the south the cloud cover increased and there were some mist and fog patches hanging around the Jersey coast. Just as Jersey Met forecast, the wind started to increase from the south.

 

How far have I paddled?

Over the years I have come in for some ridicule as I have kept a kayaking log book. My first entry was in January 1979 and since that date I have made a record of every time that I have been in a canoe or a kayak.  Sometimes it might just be a brief note whilst at other times it might be a comprehensive record of where we parked the car, what the launch was like, any wildlife seen etc.  Due to the fact that I have kept the log book going for so long it has now become almost impossible to stop  The great thing is it is a record of how far I have paddled.
Early in 2012 I was wondering to myself as to whether I paddled the equivalent of the circumference of the earth at the equator?  First of all how far is it around the equator.  Plenty of places will give you the distance in kilometres and statute miles, it was only after a bit of searching that I found the answer in nautical miles, it is 21639nm.  My log book records have always been in nautical miles so this was an important figure to find.
I then sat down with the log books and over a couple of hours completed a table. There were 5 columns, standing for year, sea kayak, sit on top, canoe/general purpose and total.  I passed the magical distance on the 19th May 2012 whilst on a trip out to the Paternosters.
So if you don’t already keep a log book think about starting keeping a record of your paddling experiences, in a few years time it will make interesting reading.  I don’t have a log book from 1969 to 1979 sadly, as there could be some interesting reading about a number of sea kayaking adventures, including being pulled of the water by Tito’s police in the former Yugoslavia, as we naively thought it was alright to paddle on the sea in communist countries.

The oldest picture I have scanned in. The first trip to the Ecrehous, August Bank Holiday Sunday 1974. Is it really 40 years since I first paddled out to the Ecrehous. Possibly the best one day paddle anywhere. This was probably the first ever organized paddle by the Jersey Canoe Club, which we had just formed. This was 5 years before I started keeping a log book but it was a pretty memorable day.
How far
A few months after I started keeping a log book. An evening surf session in May 1979 at St Brelade’s. We were so proud of our KW7’s. So versatile, one day we would be rock hopping the next heading out to an offshore reef.
How far
One advantage of keeping a log book is that you are able to track your memorable paddles. This is dawn on the morning of my 150th paddle to the Ecrehous, we are packing away before returning to Jersey.
How far
The day that I passed the equivalent of the circumnavigation of the earth. Getting ready to leave the Paternosters.

I wrote this article a couple of years ago and since then my mileage has continued to increase and in the last 12 months, at an even faster pace. In October I passed the 26,000 nautical mile mark recorded in my log book.

How far
Passing the 26,000 nautical mile mark, whilst kayaking around Stomboli, Italy. A truly memorable day on the water.

How far can you see?

How far can you see whilst sitting in your kayak?  Knowing how far away you can see an object whilst paddling is a useful technique and a valuable aid to navigation.  As a simple rule the higher up you are the further you can see.  Standing on top of the Empire State Building, with good visibility it is amazing how far away the horizon is.  Also the taller the object you are looking at the further away that it can be seen.
As paddlers it is not that easy to raise our eye level, our eyes are generally just less than 1 metre above sea level.  At times in rough weather or when there is a swell running it is possible to take advantage of the extra elevation that results from being on top of the swell to increase how far we can actually see.    Due to the movement up and down of the kayak, on the water, the distance off an object which is obtained should be seen as an approximation.
Clearly a further problem is caused by the rise and fall of the tide, which may well be significant in certain areas.  For example on a chart a lighthouse’s charted height is given above MHWS.  In certain areas of the world with a large tidal range the height above water of the light may vary by more than 10 metres, considerably affecting the distance away that the light may be seen from.  If you want to be really accurate it is necessary to add the estimated height that the tide is below MHWS to the height of the land or the light before referring to the table.
An example of the effect of this from a trip to the Ecrehous, on a large spring tide, is as follows:
Maitre Ile at the Ecrehous has a height of 8 metres at MHWS, which in Jersey is 11.1 metres, but the tide on Saturday was 11.8 metres, it was bigger than a mean spring.  This meant that at high water the maximum height of Maitre Ile was not 8 metres but 7.3 metres.
When the eye of the observer is 1 metre above water level an object 8 metres high is visible from 7.8 nm away but when the height of the object drops to 7 metres  it is not visible until you are within 7.4 nm.  When we left La Rocque, Maitre Ile was 8.3 nm away.  This meant that even in excellent visibility we would have not been able to see our destination when we left.
On a spring tide when the water level may drop by as much as 11 metres the highest point on Maitre Ile is now 19 metres above the water level.  This means that the island is now visible from 10.9 miles away for a paddler whose eye is 1 metre above the water.
The lesson is that objects will be visible from much further away when you approach them at low water, particularly in an area with a large tidal range, such as the Channel Islands.

Visibility
Approaching Maitre Ile, early on a Saturday morning. We had been paddling for some time before our destination came into view. The following table gives an approximate relationship between the distance from which an object is visible and its height above sea level. It is assumed that the height of the paddlers eyes above water is 1 metre.

The table below shows the distance at which, an item becomes visible depending upon its height above water.  This is based upon the observers eye being 1 metre above the level of the water.

Clearly there are number of variables which impact upon the accuracy of the above table such as sea state, the exact height of the paddlers eye above sea level and the height of the tide but it is a useful tool in helping the sea paddler to locate their position.  For example 12 nautical miles to the south of my nearest beach is the superb reef of the Minquiers.  The tallest rock on the northern edge is only 3 metres high, which according to the table means that they only become visible when they are 5.5 nautical miles away.  Therefore there is no point in even starting to look for the reef until you have paddled for over 6 nautical miles or have been underway for over an hour and a half.
Using this technique as a way of assisting navigation is particularly satisfying but it is a method which is gradually slipping into obscurity.  Today the vast majority of us simply turn to the switch on the GPS to receive far more accurate information about our position than we could ever obtain by using the above method.  That said there is a degree of satisfaction from being able to navigate using the more traditional methods and you never know if the batteries are going to run out!

Visibility
The photo is of La Conchiere Beacon. At MHWS it is 2 metres high and so is visible from 4.9 nautical miles away from an observer whose eye is 1 metre above sea level. Clearly an object this narrow would be more difficult to sea that something more substantial, such as a reef but of similar height.

Even more old kayaking photographs

Once you are set up to scan your old slides, its difficult not to keep going and scan a few more.  So a few memories of sea kayaking, from old photographs taken in the 1970’s and 80’s.

Old photographs
This is a memory from the first paddle that I really recorded on film. August Bank Holiday Sunday in 1974. We decided to go to the Ecrehous. It was a big spring tide and we had no idea about tidal vectors. We did leave from Gorey as we realized that the tide would be running north really quickly. We survived but it wasn’t an easy paddle.  I think that we were pretty lucky in our home made kit.
Old Photographs
5 years later and knowledge and equipment had surged forward in leaps and bounds. Nicky off the Ecrehous in 1979. Those were the days when we used to tie our BS3595 Lifejackets on the rear deck.
Old photographs
Pete Scott had just purchased his new Nordkapp, so at Easter 1981 we rushed off to Pembrokeshire to launch the kayak. He was keen to practice his self rescues.
Old photographs
The Skerries in April 1982. This was when lighthouses were still manned so we carried out our duty and delivered the daily papers and fresh milk to the keepers. It almost always resulted in an invite into the lighthouse for coffee and a chat.
Old Photographs
My first ever visit to the Isle of Wight. November 1983, it was a quick Sunday run from Lymington to the Needles with lunch at Alum Bay. Sadly that is still the only time that I have paddled on the Isle of Wight.
Old photographs
Just north of Fishguard in Pembrokeshire. October 1989 and Nigel Foster, Howard Jeffs and myself were running a Level 5 coach assessment. In common with so many assessments at the time it coincided with a major storm hitting the Irish Sea.

Another Wednesday on the Ecrehous

I paddled out to the Ecrehous this morning, it was my 7th visit of the year so far but interestingly the 5th time I have been on a Wednesday. I have only visited once at a weekend and that was way back in January.
It would be interesting to conduct a scientific study and hopefully come up with some fascinating conclusions which indicate a correlation between the passage of areas of high pressure over the Channel Islands shipping area on the third day of the week. In reality though I think that the reason for the popularity of the Wednesday visits is due to the fact that a number of people in the Jersey Canoe Club had retired or are working significantly reduced working weeks. We have put Wednesday aside as our day of choice for day trips, hoping to go out somewhere every week.
Looking at the weather forecasts as soon as there is an indication that the winds might be reasonably light on the Wednesday our thoughts turn to offshore paddles.  This week was no different, a quick WhatsApp on Tuesday and this morning saw 8 0f us paddling away from St Catherine’s towards the Ecrehous.
I have visited the reef numerous times over the years, the last time was just a few weeks ago but always jump at the chance to go again.  It was a relatively smooth crossing and a great lunch spot but it was the return crossing which was particularly memorable.  The encounter with the pod of bottle nosed dolphins was as good as I have ever seen, they remained with us for probably 20 minutes, at times approaching within a metre before suddenly changing course and diving.
What a great way to spend a Wednesday in November.

Ecrehous
Paddling in through the outer reef of the Ecrehous. It was a quick 5 nautical mile crossing.
Ecrehous
Arriving at the Ecrehous. There was only one other boat visiting the reef on this Wednesday in November.
Ecrehous
The classic view north from near the bench on the Ecrehous.
Ecrehous
Preparing to leave the Ecrehous for Jersey. The French coast is visible behind.
Portugese Man of War
On the return to Jersey we saw 3 Portugese Man of War. In 48 years of kayaking in the Channel Islands I had only ever seen one other.

Ecrehous – a reef north east of Jersey

Located nearly 6 nautical miles north east of Jersey are Les Ecrehous.  Now I might be biased but I consider a visit to this reef one of the finest one day sea kayaking trips possible anywhere.  Last Saturday and Sunday as Storm Brian lashed the Channel Islands it seemed inconceivable that by Wednesday we would be heading out from St Catherine’s for a late October visit.
That’s is just what we were able to do yesterday.  A reasonably early departure from St Catherine’s Breakwater, so us taking advantage of the high water slack to cross the current, which in a couple of hours time would be endeavouring to sweep us sideways.  The tidal flow rates, weren’t going to reach the 5+ knots, that they can do on Springs, but they were still going to have an impact.
In the days of GPS and electronic plotters I am not sure how many people are still going through the process of laying off a course, producing vectors, using Portland Protractors and dividers etc every time they head out.  Certainly as kayakers operating in Channel Island waters it is a process that we have to go through every time we embark on an open crossing.  The chart work had produced a course of 25 degrees and the GPS was just used to monitor our possible drift.
The tide was running swiftly as we paddled around the end of St Catherine’s but the crossing to the Ecrehous reef seemed remarkably straightforward.  The 6 mile crossing taking 1 hour 20 minutes.  We had been hoping for some autumn sunshine, unfortunately it was a rather grey day.  The real bonus of the of the visit was that we had the area to ourselves for most of the time that we were there, in complete contrast to a visit on a summer weekend when the reef can feel really crowded.
Heading back to Jersey the tide had a bit more impact on our progress but we still made it back, in plenty of time, for the inevitable coffee at St Catherine’s.

Ecrehous
Playing in the tidal race formed as the water runs over the shingle bank.
Ecrehous
Sheltering from the wind whilst having lunch.
Ecrehous
Looking north across the reef from near the bench.
Ecrehous
Waiting for the tide to drop so that we could walk to the north of the reef.
Ecrehous
Looking back towards Marmotier

Polishing your kayak

This is an updated version of an article I wrote in 2005 regarding the use of shoe polish to improve the look of my 1980’s vintage Nordkapp HM.

Polishing your Kayak
 Always one for the soft touch as I walked around the London Boat Show I was convinced, along with a couple of companions, that I really needed some leather balsam for protecting my shoes.  I parted with my £10.00 and walked on my way.  Some time later I stumbled across some fibre glass polish, now this was interesting as my 20 year old Nordkapp was starting to show its age.  Whereas £10 seemed a huge amount for shoe polish I was far more willing to part with £40 to protect my beloved sea kayak.
I returned home with two types of polish with the aim of writing a review of the one for fibre glass.  I followed the instructions and sat back to review my handy work.  With my hand on my heart I felt unable to write a review as I didn’t want you, dear reader, to make the same mistake as me and part with their hard earned cash.  The fibre glass polish was really disappointing.
Each week I used the leather balsam on my shoes never realizing that I held in my hand the key to restoring my kayak to some of its former glory.  That is until Chris said, “Have you tried the shoe polish on your kayak?”  Somewhat sceptically I applied the polish, it was quick and easy to do and the impact was amazing.  Almost instantly scratches appeared to disappear and the colours were restored.

Polish

A photograph taken in 2005, which clearly illustrates the difference an application of         Renapur polish can make to the appearance of a kayak.

Once the kayak was on the water the droplets glistened in the sunlight, it was just like paddling a new kayak.  The great thing is that it only takes a matter of minutes to re-apply the polish, therefore it can be repeated on a regular basis ensuring that your precious kayak maintains its perfect looks.

Kayak polish

Paddling around Nordkapp in August 1986. At this point the kayak was just over 12 months old. There has been a lot of water under the hull since then.

Kayak Polish

The Nordkapp on a beach in Greenland in 1993, still looking pretty good.

Polish

The freshly polished front deck. Unfortunately it wasn’t sunny, if it had been the water droplets would be sparkling.  This was taken today returning to Jersey from the Ecrehous.

The product is “Renapur Leather Balsam”.  Forget your shoes apply it to your kayak!

Contact www.renapur.com for further details.

Channel Islands Nostalgia

Following on from some previous nostalgic postings, this one describes a paddle that Peter Scott and myself undertook in August 1989. The catalyst for the idea was the arrival of a sea worthy two man sea kayak on the market, the Aleut, designed by Howard Jeffs.  The aim was a non stop circumnavigation of the Channel Islands, a distance of approximately 125 nautical miles.
Just before dawn on an August Saturday we launched from Corbiere, the south west corner of Jersey.  Heading along the south coast of the island until we were able to head out towards Les Ecrehous.  We passed in between France and this delightful reef before picking up an energetic, north flowing tide, towards  Alderney. The 30 nautical miles were covered in just under 5 hours.
From the Alderney Race we passed to the north of Alderney before heading west towards the Casquets.  There was a huge volume of water heading south, creating boils and overfalls, which added some spice to the paddle.  Navigating only with a Silva compass as we passed the Casquets we were ahead of schedule and starting to feel slightly optimistic, after 9 hours on the water, that we would complete the circumnavigation.
Unfortunately visibility wasn’t that great, and this was pre-GPS, so it wasn’t until we arrived off the northern tip of Herm that we realized we were east of our intended track.  We had to cross the Little Russel and head back to the northern tip of Guernsey before starting down the west coast of the second largest island in the Channel Islands.
As we head south, after over 14 hours of sitting in the kayak and becoming mentally and physically tired we realized that the time lost heading south from the Casquests meant that we had missed the tidal window to cross from the Hanois back to Corbiere.
Reluctantly we headed to shore, after having covered approximately 90 nautical miles.  As we climbed out of the cockpits we discovered that our legs had decided not to work and had to crawl part of the way up the beach.  Fortunately we had landed in front of a local pub so were able to revive our spirits as we called home to check in.  The first contact for nearly 15 hours, this was pre-mobile phone as well as pre-GPS.
As we recovered from the exertion of the day trip we were able to look at the route in an analytical fashion and learn from our mistakes, the plan was to return the following year and complete what we started but weather windows and time off didn’t coincide so it is an unfinished project, for Pete and myself at least.
Channel Islands

Channel Islands
John Richardson and Ian Hamon finally became the first paddlers to complete the non stop circumnavigation of the Channel Islands in June 2000. This was taken on their arrival back at La Pulente. To this day there are the only sea kayakers to have completed the unsupported journey around the islands.

Ecrehous Sovereignty

It was 60 years ago today, 17th November 1953, that the Sovereignty of both the Ecrehous and Minquiers was awarded to Jersey by the International Court of Justice.  These are two delightful reefs off the coast of Jersey.  The Minquiers, the larger of the reefs are approximately 12 miles south of the Island whilst the Ecrehous are about 5 miles north east of Jersey.
Both reefs are superb sea kayaking destinations But I can’t help but wonder how different things might have been if sovereignty had been awarded to France, with all of the restrictions that have been placed on our sport by the French authorities over the years.
There was a half hearted attempt by a few renegade French men to invade the Ecrehous in the 1990’s but that has faded away.  Today both these reefs remain as exceptional sea kayaking destinations for Jersey paddlers and visitors to the Island.

Ecrehous
Looking to the east, the French coast is just visible.
Ecrehous
Exploring the reef on delightful summers afternoon.
Ecrehous
Looking to the west. Jersey is just visible.
Ecrehous
Its days like this, which make the Ecrehous such a special place.
Ecrehous
It is only when seen from the air that the full size of the Ecrehous reef can be appreciated.

The last Invasion of the British Isles?

As regular readers will know my favourite sea kayaking trip is to the Ecrehous, a delightful reef to the north east of Jersey. Last weekend we were fortunate enough to visit the islands on the large spring tide and had access to one of the huts for the evening. Reading through an old visitors book there was a recording of the events which unfolded during what is possibly the “last invasion of the British Isles”.
In 1993 a group of French fishermen landed on the reef and pulled down the Union Flag, which flies when people are in residence on the reef. It flies over the southern end of La Marmotiere.
Ecrehous
Information was received that in 1994 a large “invasion” was planned but this time the Jersey police were ready to protect the sovereignty of the reef. The events of the day are recorded in the visitors book by the Police officers who were on the reef.
Ecrehous
Ecrehous
The log records the following activity during the day:
9th July 1994

Pc 188 (………. ……….)
Psgt 161 (……. …………)
Police HQ, 24, States of Jersey Police Officers and St Martins Honorary Police landed at 06.00 in response to threat from French fishermen of a mass planned demonstration by extension of Jersey territorial waters. 09.30 hrs first boat with demonstrators arrived. 10.30 hrs 6 large fishing boats arrived with 100 demonstrators including 12 right wing activists. 11.30 mass with French Priest held on the stone beach, demonstration urged to take action to lay claim to Les Ecrehous. 13.00 fight between two fishermen at the official flag pole was dealt with by Police. Reinforcements – further 12 officers shipped in. A very welcome sight – a calming influence to see the Duchess and two rigid raiders. All demonstrators left on good terms with the community and Police Scene Commander Supt Jones ordered stand down at 19.00. Two officers left on the island overnight.

Ecrehous
The Priest and some of the crowds on the shingle bank. (Apologies I have been unable to discover the photographer)
Ecrehous
The Ecrehous as they should be seen, peaceful with clear waters and interesting tidal flows.

It is easy to see why some French would want to take over the sovereignty of the Ecrehous but the International Court of Justice ruled in favour of Jersey on the 17th November 1953. It would be interesting to find out if there has been a more recent “invasion” of the British Isles.