Sea Kayak Symposiums of the Past

Whilst continue to look through my old slide collection I came across a number of photographs, which help to illustrate what informative and entertaining events the Jersey Sea Kayak Symposiums have been over the years.  In addition they have attracted a number of paddlers who are well known throughout the sea kayaking world.
The next Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be held in May 2019, it should have been May 2018 but the organisers of the Scottish Symposium asked if they could use the slot and we readily agreed.

Symposium
1992 was the year of the first Symposium, attracting about 60 participants. Unusual sessions include this one being run by Dave Collins, who became better know through his work with UK Athletics. Also in the picture are Kevin Danforth, at the time editor of Canoe Focus and Martin Melling who was Secretary of the BCU Sea Touring Committe at the time (I think).
Symposium
The social side has always been important, the 1992 BBQ. The person in the blue sweatshirt is my dad (Ray Mansell) who was Chairman of the Jersey Canoe Club at the time. This picture was taken outside the Club cottage at Egypt on the north coast of the Island
Symposium
In 1994 we were fortunate enough to have French paddler Didier Plouhinec talking about Greenland paddling. At the time it hadn’t really been seen that frequently in the UK.
Symposium
Based at the Canoe Club premises launching was sometimes a problem when the wind was in the east. Monday in 1994 was borderline, for some people, particularly if you had a composite kayak.
Symposium
The weather had been kinder earlier in the weekend. Derek Hairon is running a towing session, off the same slip. Peter Midwood is one of the paddlers observing.
Symposium
Rolling sessions have always been popular, they remain so to this day. This is rolling 1994 style with Graham Wardle.
Symposium
By 1996 we had a swimming pool for the Greenland session but still didn’t have enough kayaks and paddles to go around. Gordon Brown is demonstrating the techniques whilst world authority, John Heath gave a running commentary. We were really fortunate to have two such icons of the sea kayaking world.
Symposium
Gordon setting up for another roll.
Symposium
1996 was the third Symposium and Derek Hutchinson had been to all three. His on water sessions were always popular but it was his talks which were the most memorable. Anybody who heard his North Sea Crossing talk will never forget it.
Symposium
Graham Wardle and Donald Thompson clearly discussing the finer points of a particular stroke, outside the clubhouse of Jersey Canoe Club.
Symposium
Cliff jumping has always been a popular Jersey sport. Here is Barry Howell jumping off the Paternosters. Derek Hutchinson is the paddler.
Symposium
1996 was the year that we finished the event with a sea kayak slalom. Possibly the only slalom ever held when every entrant was in a Skerry.
Symposium
Pete Scott ran a sea anchor session, the first time it appeared on the programme in Jersey.
Symposium

Howard Jeffs discussing paddling with Terry Harlow from the United States.
Symposium
The 4th Symposium was 1998 and were fortunate to have Bill Oddie as our personal guide on the sea birds paddle. I paddled him around in a double Spud which proved to be ideal for the task.
Symposium
Gordon Brown was back, in 1998, and here he is working on a small wooden kayak which had been designed by Duncan Winning. It was completed over the period of the Symposium. In following events Duncan stuck to making Greenland paddles as they take less time.
Symposium
The event has always attracted coaches who have been able to offer something different. Mike McClure from Northern Ireland has been a popular and regular contributor.
Symposium
As well as visiting coaches local paddlers have also worked on many sessions. Nick Queree is running a navigation session in 2002.
Symposium
Chris Jones is running a rolling session in 2006, as popular then as it was 12 years earlier.
Symposium
In 2008 the BBQ was still going strong on the Monday night, prior to the start of the extended paddling programme. Now the Monday night is the Symposium meal with the BBQ normally on the Thursday.
Symposium
One of the most popular paddles in the following week is always the day trip to the Ecrehous. In 2010 on at least one day we had great weather.

The 2019 Jersey Sea Kayak Symposium will be the 13th time that the event has been held over a period of 27 years and it all came about after Bill Small and Pete Scott had attended the Anglesey Symposium in 1991 and decided that Jersey Canoe Club could do something similar.

Greve de Lecq: always enjoyable

By default I found myself arranging the Jersey Canoe Club Sunday morning session. Considering tide and weather I chose Greve de Lecq, a delightful beach on the north west corner of the Island. In actual fact it would have been possible to go almost anywhere but I hadn’t been from Greve for some time, a fact which helped to influence my decision.
You are spoilt for choice at Greve de Lecq, heading east and west there are sections of cliff, interspersed with numerous caves whilst to the north are the Paternoster’s, one of the reefs which are located around Jersey.  Today there were some large clouds around with the possibility of thunderstorms so we selected the coastal option, heading east.

Greve de Lecq
On the beach at Greve de Lecq. Substantial clouds.offering the prospect of lightning are visible to the north.  We were deciding whether to head east or west.

The great thing about this section of coast is that almost immediately there are numerous caves waiting to be explored and today the lack of any significant swell meant that we could wander almost anywhere.

Greve de Lecq
This is one of the longest caves that I am aware of anywhere on the Island. At this point I was probably only a third of the way in.

Besides the caves there are numerous narrow channels waiting to be explored.  Just over a mile to the east of Greve de Lecq is Ile Agois, one of the most dramatic physical features on the Island.  Separated from the headland by a narrow channel the surrounding cliffs produce an almost totally isolated stack.  Excavations in the 1950’s and 70’s of the summit area uncovered a significant amount of iron age pottery, plus the remnants of some small huts.  It might also have provided sanctuary for a small community of monks.  It is likely at that time the stack was joined to the headland, otherwise it would have been a very challenging place to survive.

Greve de Lecq
Looking north from inside Ile Agois. The remains of the small settlement are to the right of the highest point.
Derek Hutchinson
The back cover of “The Complete Book of Sea Kayaking” by Derek Hutchinson. Published in 1994, although the photograph was taken in 1989. It shows Derek on the outside of the obvious arch, which cuts through Ile Agois.

I have fond memories of paddling in this area in the 1980’s with Derek Hutchinson, who at the time was probably the best known sea kayaker in the world with his televised expeditions as well as his crossing of the North Sea by kayak in 1976, when on a 31 hour paddle they were out of sight of land for 30 hours.
To the east of Ile Agois is another significant coastal feature, Devil’s Hole.  The scene of a shipwreck in 1851, when the French cutter, Josephine, ran aground.  One of the crew was drowned whilst the other 4 were rescued by Nicolas Arthur, the owner of The Priory Inn at the top of cliffs, plus a friend.  The figurehead from the ship was washed into the bottom of Devil’s Hole, from where it was rescued, before being carved into the shape of the Devil, before being put on display, hence its name.

Greve de Lecq
Not the view of Devil’s Hole that most visitors get.

Before returning to Greve de Lecq we explored the narrow channels towards Sorel, coming across the rather strange breathing rock.  A couple of hours on a Sunday morning is a great time to explore the Islands coastline with the Jersey Canoe Club and today didn’t disappoint.