St Peter’s Valley Cycle Route

Jersey has some great cycle routes but not that many which are exclusively dedicated to two wheels. There is the classic St Helier to Corbiere cycle path whilst from St Helier heading east the coverage is very patchy.  In the last few months there is a new kid on the block, in the form of  St Peter’s Valley Cycle Path.
Completed at a cost of approximately £1.77 million it is clear that there would be a degree of disquiet from certain sections of the Island community.  The usual statements that the money could be better spent elsewhere with very little consideration given to the benefits, to both residents and visitors, provided by such a facility.
It has taken some time for all the pieces to be joined together but we have now is an excellent facility for locals and visitors alike. Providing a fast and safe way from from the south coast to the north west parishes.
You leave the cycle path along the front from St Helier to St Aubins just before Beaumont, if you are heading west. There is a small car park (actually known as Le Perquage car park) and a pelican crossing, which gives access to the start of the cycle route.
The first section follows the long established Perquage path, which can be rather damp at times.  At Sandybrook there is a couple of hundred metres along the road before reaching the new cycle path as it comes down St Peter’s Valley, close to Tesson Mill.  This is one of the few remaining mills on the island and there has probably been a mill at this site since the 11th century.  the present building was built in 1831 and it was purchased by the Jersey National Trust in 1996.  Although part of the building has been converted into residential properties some of the main industrial elements have been retained and are open to the public in summer on Monday and Tuesday 10.00-4.00.
The red tarmac route starts to wind its way through the valley, following the route of the stream, which in the summer is barely noticeable but can become quite a torrent during the winter months.  Pretty quickly you arrive at the only working mill which is left on the island, Le Moulin de Quetivel, also owned by the National Trust for Jersey.  The mill was briefly brought back into use during the German occupation, after which it fell into disrepair, it was restored in 1976 and now is open to visitors during the summer months.
Ahead lies the Vic in the Valley pub where refreshments and and drinks are available, a small link route takes you from the main cycle track to the pub.
The path continues its way up the valley, with a number of interesting footpaths leading off to the west.  A potential activity for exercising your legs in a different way to cycling.  Eventually the path comes to a stop at the main St Peter’s Valley road.  It is necessary to cross the road and drop down a small road to the left before reaching one of the most interesting sections of the whole route.
It is largely an elevated section with lovely views across the small reservoir, on which there are normally a number of interesting birds.
The cycle route comes to an end but a little bit of searching will lead to a small isolated valley, which will allow you to continue cycling towards St Mary’s Church.  From here there are numerous options where to go next.  Following one of the excellent numbered cycle routes from Visit Jersey, or designing your own journey along the numerous small lanes, which are found in the area.
During my ride through the February sunshine I was amazed at the variety of birds I encountered en route.  The Brent Geese, were grazing on Goose Green Marsh and as I cycled up the valley I saw a grey heron, buzzard, marsh harrier, little grebe and little egret, whilst heard a water rail calling close the northern reservoir.  These were just a few of the many species I saw in just a few miles.
The St Peter’s Valley cycle route is a valuable asset to the cycling portfolio in Jersey, a lovely surface to ride on, taking you through some of the finest scenery in Jersey’s heartland.

St Peter's Valley
The initial part of the route from the sea front to the St Peter’s Valley cycle route follows the Le Perquage Path. To my left was Goose Green Marsh.
St Peter's Valley
The start of the new cycle route is close to Tesson Mill. A dramatic property, which provides a link to Jersey’s industrial past.
St Peter's Valley
It is just a lovely surface to ride on, along one of the prettiest valley’s on the island.
St Peter's Valley
The last working mill in Jersey. There is an Open Milling Day once a year, when flour is produced for sale in the small shop.
St Peter's Valley
Approaching the sharp turn in the valley, which is also where the Vic in the Valley is located.
St Peter's Valley
As the cycle route heads north in places in runs along an elevated track. Perfect for riding on.  This is close to the dam for the small reservoir.
St Peter's Valley
The small reservoir always holds a variety of waterbirds. There were tufted duck and a little grebe on the water, whilst I heard a water rail calling as I cycled past.
St Peter's Valley
The final climb from St Peter’s Valley to St Mary’s follows this secluded valley.  The cycle route has finished but it is still possible to find virtually traffic free routes.

Cycling – the small details matter

It was another day cycling various routes around the Island, mainly on routes 1 and 3, with a few other lanes thrown in as well. Often when we are out and about we focus on the big picture, looking at the dramatic seascapes or photographing towering cumulus clouds whilst missing out on some of the small features. Bikes are the perfect vehicles to allow us to view these smaller features, which are often missed whilst driving.
We headed into St Helier and whilst cycling around the harbour my eye was caught by a riot of colour at the base of a wall.  It was a plaque to commemorate those Islanders who served in Burma from 1941 to 1945, and had been unveiled the day before.  Amazingly as we stood and considered the information that it contained we were joined by two other people, one of whom was the son of the first named person on the plaque.

Cycling
Close to South Pier this plaque carrying the names of 42 Islanders who served in the Forgotten Army in Burma was unveiled yesterday.

After a stop in Gorey for coffee and cake we decided to head back west on the Cycle Route 3.  This is one of a number of cycle routes, which cross the the Island, further information about the routes is available from Visit Jersey.  Cycle Route 3 is one of the hardest options as it goes straight across the Island, up and down numerous valleys.  Just over 14 miles in length with nearly 2,000 feet of ascent.

Cycling
The route follows a number of very quiet lanes, which in places are almost traffic free.

As you follow the route you come across some features, which are almost unique to Jersey.  Many of these would be missed if driving or they are in places where it would be difficult to stop and examine them in greater detail.  We came upon this Parish Boundary Stone at a road junction.

Cycling
This Parish Boundary stone was laid in 1881. St John to the west and Trinity to the east. Not only have we crossed parish boundaries the design of the road names varies from each parish.

This toad made me stop and look in Waterworks Valley.  It has been developed by Michelle Caine and Alcindo Pinto, working with the National Trust for Jersey.  I had been away from the Island when the project was launched therefore it came as a complete surprise, and I thought I knew may way around the Island pretty well.

Cycling
A willow toad in Waterworks Valley. A project arranged with the National Trust for Jersey.

The final surprise was a rather old everyday object.  A Victorian Post Box!  Post Box No. 45 was made between 1861 and 1871 and still has a collection at 09.00 Monday to Friday, although I do wonder how many letters are posted here each day.

Cycling
A 19th Century Post Box set into a wall in St Mary. There are only 4 examples of this type of Post Box left in Jersey.

These are just a sample of the interesting features that can be encountered when cycling around Jersey.  We are already planning a different route for next week.