Cycling – the small details matter

It was another day cycling various routes around the Island, mainly on routes 1 and 3, with a few other lanes thrown in as well. Often when we are out and about we focus on the big picture, looking at the dramatic seascapes or photographing towering cumulus clouds whilst missing out on some of the small features. Bikes are the perfect vehicles to allow us to view these smaller features, which are often missed whilst driving.
We headed into St Helier and whilst cycling around the harbour my eye was caught by a riot of colour at the base of a wall.  It was a plaque to commemorate those Islanders who served in Burma from 1941 to 1945, and had been unveiled the day before.  Amazingly as we stood and considered the information that it contained we were joined by two other people, one of whom was the son of the first named person on the plaque.

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Close to South Pier this plaque carrying the names of 42 Islanders who served in the Forgotten Army in Burma was unveiled yesterday.

After a stop in Gorey for coffee and cake we decided to head back west on the Cycle Route 3.  This is one of a number of cycle routes, which cross the the Island, further information about the routes is available from Visit Jersey.  Cycle Route 3 is one of the hardest options as it goes straight across the Island, up and down numerous valleys.  Just over 14 miles in length with nearly 2,000 feet of ascent.

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The route follows a number of very quiet lanes, which in places are almost traffic free.

As you follow the route you come across some features, which are almost unique to Jersey.  Many of these would be missed if driving or they are in places where it would be difficult to stop and examine them in greater detail.  We came upon this Parish Boundary Stone at a road junction.

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This Parish Boundary stone was laid in 1881. St John to the west and Trinity to the east. Not only have we crossed parish boundaries the design of the road names varies from each parish.

This toad made me stop and look in Waterworks Valley.  It has been developed by Michelle Caine and Alcindo Pinto, working with the National Trust for Jersey.  I had been away from the Island when the project was launched therefore it came as a complete surprise, and I thought I knew may way around the Island pretty well.

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A willow toad in Waterworks Valley. A project arranged with the National Trust for Jersey.

The final surprise was a rather old everyday object.  A Victorian Post Box!  Post Box No. 45 was made between 1861 and 1871 and still has a collection at 09.00 Monday to Friday, although I do wonder how many letters are posted here each day.

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A 19th Century Post Box set into a wall in St Mary. There are only 4 examples of this type of Post Box left in Jersey.

These are just a sample of the interesting features that can be encountered when cycling around Jersey.  We are already planning a different route for next week.