Beinn Chuirn

Beinn Chuirn is mountain that doesn’t readily spring to mind when thinking of Scottish summits.  After two days of inactivity, in the mountains, due to the weather out thoughts were turning to walking uphill once again.  The forecast was for improving weather as the day progressed but there was significant wind chill and fresh snow particularly in the morning.
So we looked for a mountain with a reasonable walk in and hopefully fairly steep so that we could avoid the worst of the underfoot conditions.  Two days of torrential rain must have produced some challenging conditions in places.
Beinn Chuirn is frequently overlooked by its more majestic neighbours, Ben Lui and Ben Oss.  250 metres lower than Ben Lui and a Corbett as opposed to a Munro it doesn’t have the same appeal.  For us though on a cloudy Thursday in January it seemed perfect.
A reasonable walk in, nearly 3 miles along a gently rising valley track, heading further and further into the heart of some dramatic mountain scenery.
Although a mountain area there is evidence of an industrial past and perhaps an industrial future.  Just after starting up the valley we passed the site of the abandoned village of Newton and the lead mines in the area, which closed in 1865.  Further up the valley, prior to heading up Beinn Chuirn, we could see evidence of the Cononish Gold Mine, with a tunnel being opened in the hillside in the 1990’s.
Once we were past the fences we turned up the slopes of the Corbett, there was virtually no evidence of a path.  This could be because very few walkers head this way and also because in places the lower slopes had remnants of the heavy snow, which had fallen the weekend before.
There is always a discussion about the rights and wrongs of using mapping software on mobile phones as opposed the tried and trusted method of map and compass.  I love the feel of the paper map and actually believe that the Ordnance Survey is one of the reasons we should be proud to be British but I have also embraced technology.  I have downloaded numerous 1:25,000 maps onto my phone but find that I use the ViewRanger App, far more frequently.
There are two advantages of using ViewRanger, the mapping is generally at a high enough resolution, only on a few occasions have I had to switch the OS 1:25,000 map with its detail of walls and small physical features.  Secondly, the Skyline facility enables you to take photographs, with physical features labelled, its quite handy to know that you are facing in the right direction, although I wouldn’t rely on it exclusively for navigation purposes.

ViewRanger
The map and data of todays walk.
Skyline
Using Skyline on the ViewRanger App, it names features, which we can’t even see because of low cloud. Its not an application, which I use that often but it does provide you with some extra information.

As we climbed higher conditions underfoot became more solid, clearly the temperature had dropped below freezing last night, and may still have been below zero.  The lack of wind actually made the day surprisingly warm, but it was still necessary to put on our crampons, a few hundred metres below the summit.
We didn’t hand around too long of the summit, a quick slurp of warm coffee and a Twix between us, whilst standing before we headed back towards the valley and the reasonably long walk back to the car prior to heading towards Tyndrum and coffee and cake at The Real Food Cafe.
It was another enjoyable day in the Scottish mountains and once again we were surprised by the total lack of people encountered whilst out walking.  I know that we are fortunate enough be able to go out in mid week, when it is not unusual for numbers of people in the outdoors to be reduced.  I am certain though, that if we were in the Ogwen or Langdale Valleys then we would not have had the mountain to ourselves.
For those seeking solitude and that feeling of wilderness it isn’t necessary to travel to remote corners of the world, midweek in January about 50 miles from Glasgow is always an option.

Beinn Chuirn
Nicky heading up the valley of the River Cononish. The summit Of Beinn Chuirn is above and to the right of her head. Our route pretty much followed the obvious ridge.
Beinn Chuirn
Nicky heading up the ridge on Beinn Chuirn. Some spectacular scenery behind.
Beinn Chuirn
Higher up conditions changed, there was more snow underfoot and more was falling out the sky.
Beinn Chuirn
A couple of hundred metres below the summit crampons became advisable, the rain of the last two days had clearly helped to freeze the snow higher up. It is always a pleasure fitting crampons to your boots. We don’t get that many opportunities to do so in Jersey!
Beinn Chuirn
The inevitable summit pic.
Beinn Chuirn
Crossing a stream on the descent. In places the whole stream was covered in snow. Clearly a major hazard for the walker who isn’t sure of their location.
Beinn Chuirn
We dropped below the snow and it was just a matter of heading back to the valley track and walking back to the car, 3.5 miles away.

Lochearnhead – a couple of Corbett’s

Arriving in the car park at Lochearnhead I was amazed by the amount of activity in the car park. It was actually a 10k swim along the Loch, with what seemed like substantial kayak cover. It was interesting to see Nordkapp’s being unloaded on the shores of a Loch. This was just a distraction, I had arrived to walk a couple of Corbett’s with the prospect of some pretty good weather, something which has been in short supply this week.
Finding my way into Glen Kendrum was a bit convoluted but once I was on the track up the valley the views were great. Following my incident with the bull yesterday I was surprised to find a deer standing in my way this morning, but in contrast to the bull, the deer seemed more scared of me than I was of him and quickly disappeared.
Once in the Glen my pace increased and quite quickly I had arrived at the highest point of the pass, ready to tackle the steeper slopes, which provided a barrier to the summit of Creag Mac Ranaich.  It was here that I had my first encounter with other walkers, of the week.  Quite a surprise, although it was Saturday so could perhaps be expected.

Glen Kendrum
Looking up Glen Kendrum on the walk in. Creag Mac Ranaich is visible on the right.  The track provided an easy route on both the ascent and the descent.
Creag Mac Ranaich
The steep slopes of Creag Mac Ranaich, from the col are clearly visible. Leaving the path too soon will put you on very steep slopes.  Care is needed on the descent to avoid moving too far to the left into the areas of cliffs

The slopes were pretty steep although there was a line of old fence posts, which gave an indication of the general route.  What made this Corbett particularly special were the superb views in all directions.  Ben Lawers to the north, Ben Lomond to the south, Ben More to the west and Ben Vorlich to the east, with numerous other Munro’s in between.

Ben Vorlich
Looking east with several Munro’s in view, including Ben Vorlich.
Ben Lawers
Looking north across Loch Tay towards the Ben Lawers range.  Killin is at the head of the loch.

A quick break on the summit and an entertaining descent took me back to the pass, ready for the climb up the other side of the valley.
Every now and again there was a slight hint of a path but generally the walking was across rough terrain. The ridge along to the summit of Meall an t-Seallaidh was wide and easy going.  The trig point and small cairn confirmed the accuracy of the earlier navigation, so I celebrated the last summit of the day with lunch.  Unfortunately some midges decided to join me so it wasn’t too long before I was heading down the grassy slopes to rejoin the path in Glen Kendrum and head towards Lochearnhead.
A lovely day on a couple of stunning Corbett’s.

Cam Chreag
Looking east from the summit of Corbett Top Cam Chreag. Ben Vorlich dominates the view
Meall an t-Seallaidh
The view north from the second Corbett of the day, Meall an t-Seallaidh.
Lochearnhead
Almost back to car with extensive views along Loch Earn.

Meall nam Maigheach – a short day

Meall nam Maigheach wasn’t my initial target on what started off as a very wet day.  I decided a longer walk at lower level followed by a reasonably quick ascent of a single Corbett was in order.  Car parked, waterproofs on and a steady pace set on the road up the valley.  Unfortunately in less than half a mile I had retreated, a rather large bull was blocking my way.  I am no expert in bull behaviour but this one didn’t look friendly and there was no alternative route

Large bull
This rather large bull, with its surrounding cows encouraged me to change my proposed route.  Just after I took the photograph he moved into the middle of the road.

Due the bull incident and the weather, a shorter walk was in order. I also considered whether it was worth actually heading out for a walk. Over the years I have probably spent hundreds of days wandering around the mountains of the U.K. in the rain and have to admit it is gradually loosing its appeal. On the other hand Jersey to Killin is quite some distance and I wasn’t sure when I would be passing this way again, so the decision was made, on with the waterproofs and boots.
The one advantage of the hills around the Ben Lawers range is the height at which you start walking. There is a small parking area near the large cairn and the northern end of Lochran na Lairige, I wasn’t the first person to arrive but did manage to squeeze in, taking the last place.
The walk up Meall nan Maigheach was described as a pleasant walk to do on a sunny evening, actually doing it on a rainy Friday afternoon free’s up days with better weather for more suitable challenges.
In common with every other walk that I have done this week I didn’t see another person once I left the road but today’s highlight was the number of grouse that I encountered. Strangely there were plenty on the way up but none on the way down. They were the first grouse that I had seen all week. The path quickly faded and in places the going was rather damp under foot, hardly surprising with the rain that has fallen over the last few days. Amazingly though the cloud lifted above the nearby summits giving tantalizing views of past walks and future possibilities.

Meall nam Maigheach summit
Looking north west from Meall nam Maigheach. Loch an Daimh is visible in the centre.

Lunch was taken on the summit and playing the ViewRanger app quickly gave an idea of what was hidden behind the clouds. Before too much criticism heads my way I know that you can use a paper map but everybody enjoys playing with new toys.
A quick return to the car and a drive to Killin for coffee and cake plus the obligatory visit to the Killin Outdoor Centre and Shop, where I normally find something to purchase.
Actually quite a satisfying day despite the weather and the early encounter with the bull. Just a small mountain, only 3.5 miles walked and 927 feet of ascent but Meall nam Maigheach is somewhere worth saving for a sunny evening or a wet afternoon.

Mountain Lake
Looking back towards Lochan na Lairige as I climbed away from the road. the water level was surprisingly low.
ViewRanger picture
If you are not certain what is behind the clouds just use the ViewRanger App to find out. Sadly Schiehallion wasn’t visible today.
An Stuc
The cloud lifted allowing views of some of the dramatic summits along the Ben Lawers ridge including An Stuc.