Lipari (part1) – Italian Sea Kayaking

From Vulcano we crossed the narrow channel to Lipari, our plan was to paddle north along the west coast and return south down the east coast later in the week. It seemed like a good plan, which worked, although not in the way that we intended as it actually involved rapid disembarkation from a car ferry.
The channel across from Vulcano is only a few hundred metres wide but does require a degree of caution when crossing.  It is regularly used by the high speed ferries which connect the various islands in the group. Both times we crossed we encountered ferries which necessitated in changes in direction. Approaching the south west corner of the island is like paddling onto the pages of a geography textbook.  Caves, arches and stacks all positioned in the order, which is depicted in the diagrams shown in geography books.

Lipari
Approaching the south west corner of Lipari, with its dramatic collection of caves, arches and stacks.
Lipari
Paddling through the arch which splits the large stack, Pietralunga, of the south west corner of the island.

There is one large beach on the west coast of the island, Spiaggia Valle Muria, with a small bar/cafe in a cave, which appears to have rather erratic opening times.  The remainder of the coast is a playground for the sea kayaker.   There were numerous geographical features waiting to be explored, which we took full advantage of, whilst en route to Salinas.
The east coast of Lipari, wasn’t necessarily on our agenda but a forecast of particularly strong winds encouraged us to book the ferry from Stromboli back to Vulcano.  Unfortunately the wind was stronger than forecast, which prevented the ferry docking at Vulcano.  Suddenly we were forced to abandon ship in Lipari Town.

Lipari
Unable to continue to Vulcano, on the ferry, because of the strength of the wind. We suddenly found ourselves having to make alternative plans on the harbour side.
Lipari
Looking south from the walls of the citadel.  We were to enjoy a cold beer on the harbour side later.

Our unexpected arrival allowed us plenty of time to explore Lipari Town. It is the largest settlement in the Aeolian Islands.  We were able to settle into our guest house, the Villa Rosa, a great find right on the waterfront.  The citadel proved to be an essential visit.  Walking around the narrow lanes and courtyards it was hard to imagine that Mussolini used the area to contain political prisoners.
The forecast for the following day was for lighter winds so we anticipated being able to paddle the east coast before crossing to Vulcano.