Jersey’s North Coast with Manchester CC.

Attracting canoeing and kayaking Club’s to paddle in Jersey has always proved a challenge. The concept of flying to a weekend’s paddling has been difficult to promote, although over the years Tower Hamlets Canoe Club have become annual visitors. This year at the Spanish Sea Kayak Symposium we fell into conversation with Jim Krawiecki and suggested that a group from Manchester flew south to warmer waters and experienced some of the paddling which Jersey has to offer.
After a quick paddle along the south coast yesterday using equipment courtesy of Absolute Adventures, today’ s focus switched to the north coast of the island. Meeting at St Catherine’s, were the Jersey Canoe Club has its premises, the plan was to head west on the ebbing Spring Tide before returning back to St Catherine’s as the tide started to flood. Along the way we hoped to be able to introduce the Manchester Canoe Club members to the delights of some of the Jersey tide races.
Remaining the tidal flow during the morning, we paddled from point to point, which meant that we were a significant distance offshore. The advantage was that our speed over the ground rarely dropped below 6 knots.  St Catherine’s, La Coupe, Tour de Rozel and Belle Hougue, one point after another, passed quickly.

Jersey
Paddling around the end of St Catherine’s Breakwater, some tide was still running north, contributing to our 7 knots over the ground.
Jersey
Passing White Rock on the ebb. On the return the tidal race would be running and the water would be slightly more entertaining!
Belle Hougue
There was still some movement off Belle Hougue, our final headland before lunch at Bonne Nuit. Sark is just visible behind the paddler.

Lunch was on the beach at Bonne Nuit.  The last of the ebb tide was still flowing west when we started our return paddle so we stayed close to the shore initially, passing things that we missed whilst heading in the opposite direction.

Jersey
Remains of the ship SS Ribbledale, which was wrecked on the 27th December 1926, whilst en route from London to Jersey.  This is visible just to the east of the beach at Bouley Bay at low water on Spring Tides.
Jersey
As the tide drops some isolated beaches appear around the coast of Jersey.

Our final play of the day was in the moving water at Tour de Rozel before we jumped on the tide and hitched a free ride back to St Catherine’s.  Sprinting off La Coupe we managed to reach 8.3 knots over the ground, not a bad speed on what was supposed to be a relaxing days paddle,  introducing some of the members of Manchester Canoe Club to the variety of sea kayaking that Jersey has to offer.