Herm again

The plan had been to paddle across to Herm for an evening at the beer festival but the prospect of a north easterly F6 blowing against one of the largest tides of the year required a strategic re-think.  Get the ferry from St Peter Port.  This was a decision that was completely justified when we saw the size some of the areas of overfalls.
The beer festival was great event with some interesting music from local band Buffalo Huddlestone, I had not really come across Guernsey rap music before!  The following morning allowed us time to explore this delightful Island before heading to Guernsey on the ferry.  The only downside was that this time we didn’t get to paddle across but conditions on the Wednesday were just a bit too entertaining.
 This is probably the most iconic view on Herm, Shell Beach but although I have been numerous times over the years I can’t actually remember seeing the beach at high water on a spring tide.  It came as a bit of a surprise.
Many of the visitors to the island will follow the coastal path with the result that you miss out on some pretty good scenery and the opportunity to interact with some of the locals.
The common occupies the northern part of the Island.  Sir Percival Perry, who was chairman of the Ford Motor Company, was tenant of Herm prior to the Second World War.  He converted part of the common into a golf course.
The recently restored harbour crane is now on display in front of the White House Hotel.  It was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Guernsey where it was stored until recently.  Built in approximately 1850 it was used to load Herm granite onto ships.  The rock was used in the construction of Blackfriars Bridge in London as well as the East and West India Dock Walls.  When time allows I should go through my slide collection to find pictures of the crane in use in the 1970’s and 80’s.
The south west of Herm, I have spent many a happy hour paddling these waters.
The Herm shopping parade built in the early 1960’s by a group of Italian workmen.  It always surprises me that when I visit I can find something to buy.
Looking south along the west coast of Herm.  A ferry is alongside the small jetty, which is almost submerged because of the height of the tide.  Behind lies Jethou, which was once the home of Compton MacKenzie, best known for his book “Whiskey Galore”.  To the left lies La Grande Fauconniere and to the right Crevichon.
The small island of Crevichon, which lies just to the north of Jethou, is passed quite close by when heading from Herm back towards Guernsey.  As can be seen from the profile there has been a history of quarrying on the island with the granite being used in the building of Castle Cornet in St Peter Port and possibly the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral in London.
 Sitting in the middle of the Little Russel and surrounding by some truly amazing tidal streams, is Brehon Tower.  Completed in 1856 the tower was no longer needed by the First World although it was used by the German’s in the Second World War.  Today it is the home of a small tern colony.  behind and to the right of the tower are the chimney’s at St Sampson, which are an ideal navigation mark.