Discreet Camping

We needed to be back in Dangriga on Sunday morning, with the shortest crossing being approximately 8 nautical miles. It appears that there used to be a number of campgrounds in the area but these have closed as the luxury resorts have spread.  These closures can prove to be a challenge as the closest Caye with any form of formal camping is probably Hangman’s Caye, which is in the northern part of the Blue Ground Range. Paddling from there into Dangriga would add quite a bit to the crossing. We were going to need to indulge in some discreet camping, not something we were certain was going to be that easy.
So when we left Billy Hawk Caye, we had no idea where we going to spend the night. We savoured our last paddle north, though the Blue Ground Range before crossing to Ragged Caye and then further north. As luck would have it we came across a delightful sandy beach, with shade provided by some trees, on an island with nobody else there.
As the day had progressed the north easterly wind picked up, proving to be quite lively at times. We passed a couple of hours reading and writing log books before the attraction of the water became to much to ignore.  Launching, we paddled around a couple of islands as well as heading out to Man of War Caye, a bird reserve.
The dominant species is the Magnificent Frigate Bird, with significant numbers soaring overhead as well as those perched in the trees. We were also hoping to see the Brown Bobbies, and were fortunate enough to see a couple as we sat there admiring the avian spectacle.
All birded out, we returned to commence our discreet camping. Whilst cooking the evening meal we spent sometime chatting about paddlesports and camping with a person on a SUP who just happened to be passing by.  He was the only other person we spoke to all day.
After yet another memorable sunset and rapid onset of darkness we quickly put up the tent, fairly confident that we were going to have an undisturbed night. There are so many patches of shallow water, posing significant navigational hazards there is almost no boat traffic after dark, so nobody was going to turn up and surprise us.  It was an early night as we needed to be up by 05.30 the following morning ready for our crossing to Dangriga.
One item of equipment which had proved to be completely surplus on this trip, apart from my fleece, was our lightweight sleeping bags. Not once had they come out of their dry bag. I did unpack the silk liner every night but so far it hadn’t seen any use.  In the middle of the night though, I did need to climb into the silk bag, not because of a drop in temperature but due to the fact that the wind had changed direction and was blowing into the tent. The first 10 days we had been in Belize the wind had been a constant north easterly, the direction we needed for the Sunday morning crossing, but by midnight, we definitely had a north westerly, a head wind. The next 12 hours could prove interesting.

Blue Ground Range
Our final paddle through the Blue Ground Range as we start our paddle north.
Discreet camping
What a place to pass a few hours.
Frigate Birds
Some of the Magnificent Frigate Birds which call Man of War Caye home. We paddled there in the afternoon as well as circumnavigating a couple of other islands.
Discreet camping
Our island home offered some shelter from the sun as well as having great views in 3 directions
Nicky watching the sunset. 12 hours later we would be paddling in that direction, aiming for somewhere we couldn’t quite see.

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