Sark in July

In the middle of last week the weather forecast was certainly indicating that a kayaking visit to Sark in July, was a definite possibility.  In fact, the forecast only improved as time went on, so on Saturday morning at 11.00 we were busy packing our kayaks at L’Etacq in preparation for the 12 nautical mile crossing.
The tide had just started to flow in a northerly direction and we used this flow to speed our departure from Jersey.  Crossings of this length are all about preparation.  Tidal vectors drawn in advance, key locations and times identified, followed by constant monitoring whilst on the water.
There was plenty of other boat traffic around, Channel 82, which is the reporting channel for Jersey Coastguard, was continually in use as local and visiting boat owners were taking advantage of the superb weather.  Although we were crossing a shipping lane we only encountered one large vessel, we did have to adjust our bearing to avoid a potential near miss with the ship.  This slight adjustment to our course, did cost us some time but we were really pleased with the 3 hours that the crossing took.
Sark is a truly superb sea kayaking destination, and a circumnavigation is a superb way to spend a day but this visit didn’t have enough time to explore the Island.  So it was a matter of sorting the equipment out on the beach, heading to the campsite before making the most of water Sark has to offer.  A meal had been booked at Stocks Hotel, and as usual we were not disappointed.
A great day but an early start was required the next morning to catch the flood tide home.

Sark in July
Leaving L’Etacq a couple of hours before high water, we received quite a push from the north flowing tide. Sark was about 12 nautical miles to the north.
Sark in July
In the middle of the crossing. The nearest land was about 6 miles away.
Sark in July
We had to adjust attract our track as we were on a potential collision course with a coastal freighter. I always assume that they haven’t seen us, so paddle accordingly.
Sark in July
Approaching Sark, it is always satisfying to arrive off the dramatic east coast of the Island.
Sark in July
Although there were plenty of boats at anchor in the bay there was plenty of room on the beach for our kayaks. Dixcart Bay is such a stunning location.
Sark in July
Unloading the kayaks on the beach. Despite the beach being really busy we were not concerned about leaving the equipment on the beach. It always feels really safe.
Sark in July
The Pomme de Chiens campsite is at the head of Dixcart Valley so it was relatively easy walking up to the field. Tents up and its time go and experience the best of what Sark has to offer, including a great meal at Stocks Hotel.

Copenhagen Kayaking

I have written in previous posts how much I enjoy the opportunity to paddle around a city.  Gaining a totally different perspective to that gained by those visitors who restrict themselves to dry land activities.  Recently we had the opportunity to paddle around Copenhagen.
I must admit that I was slightly apprehensive as it was the first time that I had been in a closed cockpit kayak since I ruptured my achilles at the beginning of April.  Fortunately we were in a double kayak, which meant that it had a relatively large cockpit and if started to feel rather tired I had Nicky as an extra engine.
We booked our tour with Kayak Republic, who are conveniently located in the centre of Copenhagen.  We we were quite a large and diverse group who headed away from the dock side at the kayak rental store.  It was also clear that there was a broad spectrum of ability, but most soon slipped confidently in a paddling rhythm.
It wasn’t a particularly long paddle but it did add an extra dimension to our visit to Copenhagen, which was to actually see Paul Simon, in concert, on his farewell tour but that’s another story.

Copenhagen
We were quickly passing the distinctive architecture of Copenhagen.
Nyhaven
Passing the entrance to Nyhaven, which was dug out by Swedish prisoners of war between 170 and 1673. Famous Danish author Hans Christian Anderson lived in the street for about 18 years. It is now a popular area with both tourists and locals.
Copenhagen Opera House
Opened in 2005 the Opera House is one of the most expensive ever built. It is now used as a venue on the Red Bull Cliff diving tour. It is a big jump!
Ship
On our tour of the canal network we passed close to a wide range of ships.
Copenhagen
In places we came across a number of older buildings which have been refurbished, including this housing complex.
Copenhagen
Looking back to Kayak Republic. An ideal starting point for a memorable paddle around Copenhagen

Achilles Rehab

5th April 2018 is etched in my memory as the day that I ruptured my Achilles’ tendon, whilst kayaking in Gozo. It has been a difficult and at times frustrating 3 months but today I felt I made a significant step forward on the road to recovery. For the first time I went to the gym.
Although I wouldn’t place myself in the category of a gym fanatic I must admit that when the opportunity arises I do enjoy spending an hour or so in the gym, listening to some music and working up a sweat on some of the cardio- vascular machines.
My machine of choice has always been the Concept 2 rowing machine, for a couple of reasons. Firstly it seems to be the most suitable machine for maintaining my kayaking fitness and secondly it seems to give you an all round work out , without any significant impact on the body.
I started off gently on the bike and then the cross trainer, all seemed to be going well. So I thought I would try the rowing machine, managed one pull before having to get off, it might be some time until I get back on the Concept 2. The long road back to fitness might be slow and bumpy.
The gym I go to, the D-W Gym, must have one of the best views of any. Looking across St Brelade’s Bay to Pt Le Fret, the scene of some great sea kayaking in the past and hopefully in the future, once my leg has recovered.
The next waymark on my route a degree of normality will be when I manage to get in a kayak, that day may still be some time off, but you never know.

Gym
The view from the bike in the gym. There can’t be many gyms, which have such a stunning view.
Gym
Looking out from the gym. Pt Le Fret is the headland in the distance, where there is some superb paddling.
Winston Churchill Park
Looking across St Brelade’s Bay from the Winston Churchill Memorial Park, it was not an easy walk through the trees, I had to stop and rest 3 times.

MIT – Part 2

After a wet night and voracious insects we woke to a beautiful morning and a high tide, meaning we could launch without the problems we faced landing the previous day.  It was a real shock how far the tide went out.
We headed south from the bay before rounding Indian Point and heading into Sheepscot Bay, were we began to feel the swells rolling in from the south east.  There were a couple of areas, where boomers required attention with our route finding.  As we paddled north though the swells subsided and soon we were inside the shelter of Five Islands.
It was here that we really began to appreciate one of the pleasures of sea kayaking in Maine, stopping off for a lobster lunch and a glass of Allagash Blond before carrying onto the evenings campsite.  We stopped of at Five Island Lobster Co. and ate a delightful lunch on the outdoor terrace.
The afternoon paddle to Whittum Island, where we aimed to camp for the night, easily passed by, fueled by lobster and soon we were putting up the tent on our island home.  It was a great place to sit and watch the tides swirl as the Sheepscot River went through its daily cycle.  The most obvious other residents were the ospreys, so we maintained our distance from the area around their nest.
The following morning was another incredibly early start, those fishing boats really are noisy!  We ferry glided across the ebb tide before passing through Townsend Gut, a sheltered passage, which avoids paddling around some of the larger headlands.  Heading east we had to be aware of the significant boat traffic which was operating in the area of Boothbay Harbor.  A couple of headlands, including Pemaquid Point, demand respect, particularly if the sea is anything but flat calm.
What was particularly interesting about the mornings paddle was that there was virtually nowhere to stop.  We eventually paddled all the way to Bar Island, where we were going to spend the night, 16 nautical miles and very few places to land.  In contrast to virtually everywhere else I have  paddled it is not possible to just land wherever you want.  Parts of this coast was kayaking through some very exclusive suburbs.  Lunch and rest stops require planning in advance.
Bar Island was a lovely place to stay, with a couple of wooden tent platforms, we spent the afternoon and evening exploring our island home.  The following morning some stewards form the MITA turned up and it was great to have the opportunity to discuss the Trail, with them and they very kindly took our rubbish away.

Sagadahoc Bay
It was so much easier to launch in the morning when the tide was in at Sagadahoc Bay. Planning is essential.
Five Islands Harbor
A convenient place to stop for a lobster roll and an Allagash blond.
Osprey
One of the Ospreys that we shared Whittum with.
Hendrick's Head Lighthouse
Hendrick’s Head Lighthouse, catching the late evening sun.
Pemaquid Point Lighthouse
Pemaquid Point Lighthouse was constructed in 1835 and automated in 1934.
Bar Island.
Part of the coast of Bar Island. Looks like glacial deposits.

Bar Island
Tent platform on Bar Island. A comfortable place to spend the night.

Maine Island Trail

I first visited Maine in the summer of 1994, on a canoeing trip to the West Branch of the Penobscot.  Our girls were 5 and 7, so it seemed to be a great way to get in some multi-day paddling trips.  I did manage to get a day in sea kayaking and recognized the possibilities of paddling in the area.  Over the years I heard about the Maine Island Trail but it wasn’t until 2016 that the opportunity arose to paddle a section of the Trail.
The support provided by the Maine Island Trail Association, is crucial to making the most out of your journey along the coast of Maine.  We rented sea kayaks from Portland Paddle, who were really friendly and helpful.
With the position of Portland on the Maine coast, we planned to head north east towards Penobscot Bay, before returning back to Portland, hopefully by a slightly different route.  We did delay our departure for a day because of the intensity of the thunderstorms, which were forecast.  A delay which proved to be a sensible decision from both a meteorological perspective as well as allowing us time to visit LL Bean, in Freeport.  Always a treat.
Leaving Portland we headed east through the islands, which shelter the waters of Casco Bay, having lunch on a delightful beach at the southern tip of Jewell Island before heading north to a lovely campsite on Bangs. To make the most of your journey and to support continued access to the Maine coast it is important to join the Maine Island Trail Association.
The Maine Island Trail extends for 375 miles from the border with New Hampshire all the way to Canada and the Association maintains over 200 sites, which are available for day use or camping.  Membership of the MITA provides you with an annual printed guide to the trail as well as an App, which some people find more useful.  It is an essential $45 if you are going to be kayaking in the area.
Bangs was just an ideal place to spend our first night, not too far to paddle but far enough to produce a feeling of isolation.  We were clearly on our way!  For us one of the strange things was watching the sunset over the mainland US, living on the west coast of Jersey our sunsets are always over the sea.
We woke early the next morning to the sound of the local fishing boats heading out, I am surprised that engine silencers haven’t reached the United States.  There was no need for an alarm clock, whilst we were away!  We had left by 07.40, passing just to the north of Eagle Island State Park, which was the summer home of Arctic explorer Robert Peary, on another visit I am sure we will stop to visit the museum.
Ball Head and Small Point seemed to have the potential to have challenging conditions but we paddled around in flat calm water before stopping for lunch.  Ahead we knew that there was a potential hazard in the form of the entrance to the Kennebec River, and we weren’t disappointed.  There was a significant tide race down the sides of the islands but coming from Jersey we are used to moving water and managed to comfortably hold our ferry glide just upstream of the waves before reaching the sheltered waters on the eastern side of the river mouth.
We were aiming for the Sagadahoc Bay Campground but we knew that the tide was dropping rapidly and eventually we grounded about 0.5 miles short of our target.  Abandoning the the kayaks we carried the tents and clothing up to the campground whilst waiting for the moon to perform her magic.
As the tide started to return I floated the kayaks up the channels, unfortunately as the sea started to flow in the the rain the started to fall and the insects started to bite.  I have to admit it was a pretty miserable couple of hours moving the kayaks up the bay and once I reached the shore it was a matter of retreating to the tent and not re-appearing to the following morning.
An interesting 19 nautical miles covered with a slight sting in the tail at the end of the day, but the forecast was for the rain to clear overnight so we went to sleep with a degree of optimism.

Maine Island Trail
Beach at the southern end of Jewell, where we stopped for lunch on day one.
Maine Island Trail
First nights campsite. Bangs Island
Maine Island Trail
Sunset over the land. An unusual perspective for somebody who lives on the west coast of Jersey
Maine Island Trail
Just passing to the north of Eagle Island State Park. Robert Peary’s summer residence.
Maine Island Trail
Typical scenery along the coast of Maine.
Maine Island Trail
Sagadahoc Bay, the sea has disappeared, leaving the kayaks high and dry.

Buoyancy Aids (PFD’s) & Life Jackets

One of the pleasures of my week is listening to Paddling Adventures Radio, a podcast from Canada.  Essentially Sean Rowley and Derek Specht chat about a range of topics related to all aspects of paddle sport.  This evenings opening article on people wearing buoyancy aids (PFD’s) got me thinking.
My first buoyancy aid, which I had for Christmas at the end of the 1960’s, was filled with kapok, a vegetable material, which was used in life saving devices in the Second World War.  I feel certain that it must have been one of the last buoyancy aids to contain kapok.  Towards the end of the 1970’s, most paddlers in the UK were wearing life jackets, which met the specifications of BS 3595.  They were designed to support an unconscious person in the water, if the inherent solid buoyancy had been topped up with air.
The only disadvantage, being that they were cumbersome and seriously uncomfortable.  As a consequence many paddlers used to carry them under the rear deck elastics as opposed to wearing them on the person.  As shown by the photograph of Nicky taken off the Ecrehous, in the summer of 1979.  How that contrasts with the photograph taken last summer, off the west coast of Greenland, where everybody is properly equipped.
I can’t remember the last time I paddled to the Ecrehous, with my buoyancy aid under the deck elastics.  It must be at least 20 years ago.  Putting on a buoyancy aid is now an automatic reaction.  The last time I remember consciously not putting on my PFD was on a seriously hot, flat calm day in Baja, when I judged that I was more at risk from heat exhaustion than from an unexpected capsize.
There is no doubt that equipment has improved dramatically over the last 50 years that I have been kayaking and the current buoyancy aids are far more comfortable to wear than their predecessors.  So the best advice is to wear it.
Another point to consider is the explosion in paddle sports in recent years, it is rare to be alone on the water nowadays.  Mid week in January, on a rainy windy day doesn’t guarantee isolation in 2018.
Regularly whilst out paddling we come across paddlers, particularly on sit on tops, and it is amazing how many of those paddlers aren’t wearing buoyancy aids.  What is particularly scary is when you see 3 people, normally 2 adults and a child on a double sit on top, and none of them wearing buoyancy aids.
There are 2 potential responses, paddle over and have a friendly word, I have done this a few times as people on SOT’s have been approaching tide races, but my advice has always been ignored.  The other response is to hope that by wearing the appropriate equipment you will be a positive role model and raise people’s awareness of the need to wear buoyancy aids.

Nordkapp
Nicky off the Ecrehous, in the summer of 1979. A classic image of the time, a beautiful orange Nordkapp HM and the BS 3595 Life Jacket tucked under the rear deck elastics.
Buoyancy aids
The group from the Jersey Canoe Club in Greenland last summer. All wearing their buoyancy aids, even though the conditions were pretty benign, apart from the water temperature.

The Art of Kayaking

The Art of Kayaking

I first met Nigel in 1979 at the 3rd National Sea Canoeing Symposium in Sheffield, when he spoke about his trip to Newfoundland.  Following on from this when I needed an assessor to assist with an Advanced Sea Assessment (5 Star) I asked him to come to Jersey early in 1981 and this was the first time that we paddled on the water.
It was clear right from the start that Nigel’s skill level was way ahead of most coaches who were active at the time.  I remember seeing him reverse loop a sea kayak, in a narrow gully, rotate 180 degrees and surf in the opposite direction, there was absolutely no margin for error.
Later that year Nigel went on his solo paddle in the Hudson Strait, which was significantly more challenging than anticipated.  Nigel has remained active, over the years, as a coach, designer, author and explorer and this book is a result of his undeniable passion for all things paddling.
“The Art of Kayaking” is divided into sections covering equipment, flat water skills, dry skills (navigation, weather etc), applying skills (moving into more challenging conditions) and a short section on breaking down skills.
All the chapters are supported by a large number of colour photographs, illustrating the key points.  Some of the photographs are clearly quite old, whereas others have probably been taken for the book and have been annotated clearly to emphasize the salient points.  The photographs clearly reflect Nigel’s considerable experience as a kayaker.  My only slight gripe, about the book, is that it doesn’t always say where the photographs were taken.  Its the geographer coming out in me, I like to know where places are.
This book will appeal to kayakers of all abilities, those starting out on the journey as a sea paddler will be able to dip into the book frequently as they gain experience and extend their horizons.  Coaches will also appreciate the clarity of some of the explanations and diagrams, enhancing the quality and variety of their coaching.
There are quite a number of sea kayaking manuals available and it is always difficult to decide which ones to buy.  Some are specialized, whereas others such as this one are more comprehensive and offer something to paddlers of all abilities.
If you are in the market for a sea kayaking manual or just want to add to your kayaking book collection then “The Art of Kayaking” is one book to seriously consider.

Nigel Foster
Nigel at the Port Townsend Symposium in 1995. Performing at skills session, to a crowd of approximately 100 people.

Scottish Symposium

Well the Scottish Symposium has been and gone, all that remains is the extended paddling programme.  Two things set this event from the others, firstly it is the last one in its present format and secondly the unbelievable weather.
I travelled north in the expectation that I would be delivering a range of talks, including such diverse topics as Expedition Planning, Baja and Thirds, Twelfths and 50/90’s.  As it turned out the weather was superb and in reality who would want to sit in a classroom listening to somebody ramble on about sea kayaking when they could be out on the water experiencing, first hand the impact of a Scottish heat wave.
Nearly 200 people attended the final Scottish Symposium, in its current form.  The programme was the usual diverse mix of workshops, talks and paddles, delivered by some of Britain’s most experienced coaches.  Fortunately common sense broke out among the participants and pretty much everybody went on the water with virtually every classroom session cancelled.
The key note lecture on Saturday evening, delivered by Gordon Brown and was very much in the form of a tribute to our friend Duncan Winning, who sadly passed away earlier this year.  He was one of the most influential sea kayakers of the 20th Century as well being a vital cog in the machinery of the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.  His presence at the event was sorely missed.
As the Symposium drew to a close, after a weekend of perfect weather and the extended paddling programme started you couldn’t help but think that Duncan would have been with pleased with the way the weekend had evolved.

Scottish Symposium
Nicky outside the Gaelic College, wearing her Moderate Becoming Good Later T shirt. Our nephew was starting his journey around the Shipping Forecast areas that day.
Scottish Symposium
A really unusual picture. Nicky and Gordon tucking into ice creams at Armadale. Almost unheard of at any of the previous symposiums.
Scottish Symposium
A group on a day trip around the Point of Sleat heading south in front of the College. Just a stunning backdrop.
Scottish Symposium
A busy Greenland Rolling session at Armadale. With the weather rolling was a pretty popular option.

Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium

Over 6 weeks has passed since my incident in Gozo, which resulted in a ruptured achilles, I still have my leg in plaster and at times feel frustrated by my inability to get out on the water.
This weekend I had arranged an Advanced Sea Kayak Leader training course with paddlers visiting the Island from both the UK and France to take part.  I was really looking forward to working with Olly Sanders, but it was not to be last weekend.  I was fortunate enough to be able to arrange for Calum McKerral to fly down from Scotland and cover me at the last minute.
I was able to spend some of the evening preparing for the Scottish Se Kayak Symposium, which starts this Friday evening on the Isle of Skye.  Having attended them all since 1995 it is an event, which holds great memories for me.  Some fantastic paddles, inspirational talks and great social evenings over the last 20 plus years.
As this is due to be the last one it was an event I was particularly looking forward to attending and to do some more paddling in Scottish waters.  In fact the plan was to remain in Scotland for a further week and to paddle around the Small Isles, with some of the other members of the Jersey Canoe Club.
With my leg still in plaster flying isn’t an option so Nicky and myself leave this evening on the ferry, to start the long journey north, taking slightly longer than normal as we are stopping off in Bristol to see Joan Baez in concert, on her farewell tour.
Instead of being out on the water this weekend with the Advanced Sea Kayak Leader Training, it has largely been spent inside the house preparing my talks for next weekend.  I might not be able to paddle but at least I will be able to contribute to the lecture programme.
So it has been time spent re-acquainting myself with PowerPoint and searching through external hard drives for that one photo, which I feel might make all the difference but in reality won’t have an impact at all.
So talks on Expedition Planning, the weather, tidal planning, 12ths,3rds and 50/90, Baja and sea kayaking in the Mediterranean have gradually taken shape.  Although there is still plenty of work to do before I am satisfied with the finished product.
Fingers crossed that I don’t have to deliver all of the talks.  If there is good weather on Skye next weekend people attending the Symposium should be out on the water, experiencing all that the island has to offer.  Far more enjoyable than hearing me ramble on about Proxigean Tides or the Coriolis Force, with the occasional pretty picture of kayaking thrown in for good measure.  That said if the wind blows, the rain falls and people feel the need to shelter from the worst of the Scottish weather I will be ready to go.
Whatever happens next I know that next weekend on Skye there is going to be a great sea kayaking event with plenty of paddlers having a great time.  I hope to see some of you there.

Symposium
Taken in the 1990’s these are just a selection of the kayaks lined up on the beach on Cumbrae.
Symposium
A helicopter demonstration in 2005. It was great fun being blown around by the down draught from the rotor blades.
Symposium
The extended programme in the week after the Symposium has always been enjoyable and at times experienced some great weather. Looking towards the Cuillins, on a day trip from Elgol. Always a favourite.
Symposium
Another day trip from Elgol, when the weather wasn’t so kind. Howard Jeffs on Soay, close to the basking shark factory.

Magazines Part 2

The ongoing inability to go going sea kayaking is allowing more time to peruse my canoe and kayaking magazines.  They are literally taking over the whole floor of a room in the house.  I think that over the years I have managed to collect a few, what I consider gems, although probably many would disagree.
So here is the latest selection.

Magazines
Ocean Paddler, which is still going strong. Issue No.1 appeared in May 2007 at the Scottish Sea Kayak Symposium.

This was a great and welcome addition to the sea kayaking scene in the UK.  The first edition contained articles on incident management by Jeff Allen, photography by Douglas Wilcox, Tasmania by Justine Curgenven and Expedition Planning by me ( I had actually forgotten about that until I opened the magazine).  Over the years it has contained a huge range of excellent articles and should be considered essential reading by anybody interested in sea kayaking.  It is published 6 times a year and subscriptions are available.

Magazines
A report of the Symposium held in December 1979.

This report on the Third National Sea Kayaking Symposium is looking a bit battered because the family rabbits attacked it a few years ago.  The rabbits had to go after that, they had crossed a line when they attacked my kayaking literature!
Held just outside Sheffield in December 1979, it was one of my first excursions into mainstream sea kayaking.  Organised by John Ramwell, who ran the Advanced Sea Kayak Club for many years, it had some great speakers.  Nigel Foster spoke about his circumnavigation of Newfoundland with Tim Franklin, Derek Hutchinson spoke about expeditions and the Aleutians.  Plus lots of other inspirational stuff.  It would almost be true to say that attendance at this event and seeing what people were achieving, kick started my desire to get away on sea kayaking expeditions.

Magazines
Another first edition. Canoeist evolved from White Water Magazine and was a valuable source of info in the 1980’s and 90’s.

Stuart Fisher launched Canoeist in January 1983, a change from White Water Magazine, which had been printed for years.  In the first issue Paul Caffyn was half way around Australia and 30 companies who wanted to exhibit at the International Canoe Exhibition at Crystal Palace couldn’t get space as it was sold out!  Major articles included how to complete fibre glass repairs, a review of the Mirage kayak, which paddlers of a certain age will remember with affection and guides to the Basingstoke and the Coruh River in Turkey.  In later editions there were plenty of sea kayaking articles.

Magazines
First published in 1960, this is a 1978 issue.

Canoeing was well known as the magazine in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s which had pictures of scantily clad females on the front cover.  Mainly taken, I think, in the Ardeche, this cover is kayaks in the Ardeche.  There was a mention of 1977 British Sea Kayak Expedition to Spitsbergen.  Sam Cook who was on that trip is coming to Jersey in August this year to talk at our Nordkapp meet, so why not join us.  Other articles included canoeing in North America and a photo guide to the Struer Kayak factory in Denmark

Magazines
The magazine of the British Canoe Union from the 1950’s. It evolved into Canoe Focus.

A classic front cover photograph, from the Outer Hebrides.  Nigel Matthews and Frank Goodman, who paddled around Cape Horn in 1977 are in the picture.  Obviously Frank is well known through Valley Sea Kayaks.  Chris Hare took the photograph, was a very influential figure in sea kayaking in the 1960’s and 70’s, including being involved in the production of magazines.  The kayaks look like Anas Acuta’s, notice the lack of hatches and the paddles look like Mark Gee’s paddles.  A non stop circumnavigation of Anglesey is one of the main articles.

Magazines
A French magazine, which always seemed to be well produced, with high quality photographs.

Summer 2011 and the French paddling press was already pushing SUP.  This magazine contains some articles with stunning photographs of paddling in France plus a circumnavigation of Islay, in Scotland.  It helps if you can read a bit of French but if not you can’t failed to be impressed by the quality of the images.