Octopus Pool

The evening of Saturday 18th November is the annual dinner of the Jersey Club Club at the Prince of Wales, Greve de Lecq. A number of us decided to stay the night and so to take full advantage of the area we decided that an afternoon’s coasteering out to the Octopus Pool was in order.
The Octopus Pool is one of those places where generations of young people have gained experience of exploring the coast line of Jersey, jumping into rock pools and scrambling through caves. Over the last few years it has become increasingly popular with commercial groups. During the summer months it has probably reached full capacity on some days but on a Saturday in November we were fairly certain of having the place to ourselves.
Greve de Lecq is a popular venue with the Jersey Canoe Club because of the quality of the sea kayaking which is easily accessible but today the focus was on rock scrambling and swimming as opposed to paddling.
A great afternoon’s sport setting us up for a good annual dinner.

Octopus Pool
Jacob is really enthusiastic about coasteering and is really confident for a 6 year old, when moving across the rocks.
Octhopus pool
This stone always fascinates me as the letters have been carved with such care. It says the following ASL HFM 1839
Octopus Pool
It is always a challenge to dive to the bottom to get some sand or seaweed. Most young people fail as they don’t know how to dive. In this day and age it is almost impossible for young people to learn to dive, due to health and safety concerns diving is banned in virtually every swimming pool.
Octopus Pool
At low tide the Rhino was quite a reasonable jump today, about 10 metres in height.
Octopus Pool
Its always great to be able to return to Greve de Lecq through the cave which runs underneath the headland.

Grosnez Coasteering

The cliffs of Grosnez mark the north west corner of Jersey, and it is an area rarely considered as a coasteering destination. Fully exposed to the westerly swell and with virtually no escape routes, this is not an area for the inexperienced. Today’s light winds and decaying swell drew us north in search of some watery entertainment.
We decided to travel west from Plemont to Grosnez, it meant that when we climbed up the cliffs we arrived at the cars, as opposed to having a 20 minute walk along the cliff path whilst wet.
This is a great section of the Jersey coastline for sea kayaking but today our progress was much slower but probably much more intimate as we scrambled along this remote section of the Islands coast.

Grosnez
Just to the west of Plemont there is some entertaining scrambling. Coasteering is not all about big jumps and long swims.
Grosnez
There were a number of sections where scrambling along semi submerged reefs allowed us to make relatively fast progress.
Grosnez
Inside La Cotte a La Chevre, one of the the most important Neanderthal sites on the island.
Grosnez
Descending from La Cotte a la Chevre, in preparation for our next swim.
Grosnez
Scrambling along the rocks to the west of Le Vyi. We were beginning to feel the impact of the westerly swell hitting the cliffs when we were in the water.
Grosnez
The further west we moved the more the jumps appeared. This was apleasant, small jump into one of the small gullies to the easy of Grosnez.
Grosnez
Underneath Grosnez lighthouse. I would imagine that there are very few days in a year when peiople stand here. It is not an easy location to reach.
Grosnez
The exit point just to the south of Grosnez. There are some really big cliffs around here.

 

Friday morning coasteering in Jersey

Friday mornings have generally been reserved for coasteering sessions for the Jersey Canoe Club and today was no exception.  Today was the local schools half term so when we gathered in the car park above Portelet there were 17 of us, ranging in age from 6 to 61.

Coasteering
The first jump of the day. Always a good one to start with.
Coasteering
It is always good to practice get out of the water in calm conditions before become more challenging.

As we moved along the coast there were a number of other jumps plus the opportunity to explore a cave and an offshore reef.  One of the most common misconceptions about coasteering is that it is all about jumping into the sea from great heights but nothing could be further from the truth.  Coasteering is about a journey along the coast as opposed to just jumping from the highest cliff possible.

Coasteering
Swimming into the cave between Portelet and Pt Le Fret.  The arrival of the swell created a variety water conditions within the confines of the cave.
Coasteering
The tide had just started to flow west so it was an entertaining swim across the channel to the reef off Pt Le Fret.
Coasteering
The final jump of the day. Another great session approaches its end, all that is left is the swim ashore and the scrambling up the cliffs.

Portelet either side of high tide is a great location for coasteering, so many locations are turning into locations where there are just too many people, lines of people develop at the most popular jumping locations etc.  Portelet though has always retain its uniqueness.  I have never seen anybody else there whenever I have been coasteering in the area.
Coasteering is an activity, which receives negative press at times but in reality it is one of the most exciting ways to explore the coastal environment.
For those who are interested my book on Coasteering is still available from Amazon.