Bouley Bay

The forecast for the next few days is anything but favourable so we took advantage of today’s brief respite from the storms to get a paddle in, from Bouley Bay. Towards the north east of the island it is relatively sheltered from the strongest of the wind.

Bouley Bay
With a weather forecast like this it was obvious that today was the day to get on the water, if we wanted a reasonable paddle.

The most positive aspect of paddling at Bouley Bay, though is the gradient of the beach. Being relatively steep it means that the carry to the waters edge is always pretty short, this was certainly the case today as we only had a 4.7 metre tidal range. Although large compared to most places, for Jersey it was a small neap tide.
The plan was to head east towards Rozel, hopefully for coffee and cake at The Hungry Man before returning along the coast. A fairly easy 6 mile round trip, particularly when we added a slight detour towards Belle Hougue.
As with so many places, kayaking in Jersey is set against a backdrop of historical and geographical features.  The small pier, at Bouley Bay, was built by the States of Jersey in 1829, as a small harbour for the oyster fishermen, who mainly worked off the east coast of the Island.  The lack of flat land nearby prevented the development of a significant harbour in the area, although it was considered at times.
Heading east, if the tide was lower we would be able to see the remains of the Ribbledale, a cargo ship, which ran aground on the 27th December 1926, whilst en route to Jersey from London.  Today we just paddled over her remains whilst heading towards L’Etacquerel Fort.  Constructed in the 19th century to help defend the bay, it is now available for hire from Jersey Heritage, it is ideal for visiting groups.
From here we were carried on the tide towards Tour de Rozel, or White Rock.  The location of many happy hours paddling by members of the Jersey Canoe Club, but today we didn’t hang around, we had more important things on our mind, coffee and cake at The Hungry Man, in Rozel.  Fortunately for us it was open.
The return journey was slightly longer as we wanted to get an extra couple of miles towards the British Canoeing Winter Challenge.  A very plasant 3 hours out from Bouley Bay, made all the more worthwhile when the weather forecast was updated this evening and is now showing winds stronger than shown on the forecast above.  certainly a case of “seizing the day”.

Bouley Bay
Just to the east of Bouley Bay is L’Etacquerel Fort. Built in 1836 to help protect the bay it is now available for rent as basic residential accommodation from Jersey Heritage. Not easy to access by kayak, it is still a great place to stay.
Bouley Bay
It is always worth looking backwards, occasionally. This was the view as we left Bouley Bay this morning.
Rozel
The Hungry Man at Rozel is a Jersey institution. Hot Chocolate and fruit cake were the order of the day.
Bouley BAy
One of the most significant tidal races in Jersey develops off this headland at the start of the flood tide. We had missed the fastest moving water and so were able to work away around the headland back into Bouley Bay.
Bouley Bay
Paddling around White Rock against the last of the main flood tide. In the distance can be seen Belle Hougue, which was the furthest point we reached today, before heading back to Bouley Bay.