What had been flat calm water, with not a ripple in sight, the night before was a bit different when we woke up. After 10 days of constant north easterly or easterly winds we woke to a light north westerly breeze. Not enough to put us off the paddle to Dangriga, just an inconvenience.
The tent was dropped and the rest of the equipment packed away, just after 06.00. There were some big clouds around, which normally introduce significant increases in wind speed when they pass by overhead. We monitored their direction of travel and decided that they were probably going to miss us.
At 06.50 we pushed away from the shore and settled into a steady rhythm, despite the headwind, according to the GPS, our speed over the ground was in the region of 3.5 knots, which we were pretty pleased with. Within 15 minutes though the speed had dropped to 2.5 knots and frequently less and it was to remain like that for the next 3 hours.
Although we were on spring tides, the tidal range on the day was only 0.7 feet, not that great. We actually felt that the movement of water was probably an ocean current, driven by the frequent north easterly trade winds. Whatever the cause it was a bit of inconvenience for us, as we had an 8 mile crossing to complete. As soon as we stopped paddling the track on the GPS showed that we were being pushed south at nearly 1.5 knots, rather frustrating when we were heading north.
In addition we had to continually keep an eye on the weather, there were some large cells around but all missed us by quite some distance, so at least that was something we didn’t need to worry unnecessarily about.
Gradually the buildings in Dangriga started to take shape, the sports hall to the south of the town , was the first which was clearly identified. The radio towers were perfect for leading the way back to the town.
After 3 hours 15 minutes the bows of the kayaks ran up onto the beach in front of the Islands Expedition building in Dangriga. The conclusion of some really enjoyable sea kayaking through an eco system we have rarely been exposed to. This was not wilderness kayaking, it requires planning and the willingness to camp in specific locations but for those paddlers who are interested in bird life and snorkelling Belize is a destination well worth considering.

Nicky launching from our isolated island. Ahead lies an 8 nautical mile open crossing
Although the crossing was underway we need to keep quite an acute eye on the weather. There were some big weather cells around but fortunately they missed us.
Although the rain missed us we did have good views of the rainbow.
This blue building had been visible for quite some time, it was only when we were nearly there that we realised it was next to where we needed to land.
Nicky and myself at the finish of the trip, just after landing on the beach in Dangriga

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