Beinn Chuirn

Beinn Chuirn is mountain that doesn’t readily spring to mind when thinking of Scottish summits.  After two days of inactivity, in the mountains, due to the weather out thoughts were turning to walking uphill once again.  The forecast was for improving weather as the day progressed but there was significant wind chill and fresh snow particularly in the morning.
So we looked for a mountain with a reasonable walk in and hopefully fairly steep so that we could avoid the worst of the underfoot conditions.  Two days of torrential rain must have produced some challenging conditions in places.
Beinn Chuirn is frequently overlooked by its more majestic neighbours, Ben Lui and Ben Oss.  250 metres lower than Ben Lui and a Corbett as opposed to a Munro it doesn’t have the same appeal.  For us though on a cloudy Thursday in January it seemed perfect.
A reasonable walk in, nearly 3 miles along a gently rising valley track, heading further and further into the heart of some dramatic mountain scenery.
Although a mountain area there is evidence of an industrial past and perhaps an industrial future.  Just after starting up the valley we passed the site of the abandoned village of Newton and the lead mines in the area, which closed in 1865.  Further up the valley, prior to heading up Beinn Chuirn, we could see evidence of the Cononish Gold Mine, with a tunnel being opened in the hillside in the 1990’s.
Once we were past the fences we turned up the slopes of the Corbett, there was virtually no evidence of a path.  This could be because very few walkers head this way and also because in places the lower slopes had remnants of the heavy snow, which had fallen the weekend before.
There is always a discussion about the rights and wrongs of using mapping software on mobile phones as opposed the tried and trusted method of map and compass.  I love the feel of the paper map and actually believe that the Ordnance Survey is one of the reasons we should be proud to be British but I have also embraced technology.  I have downloaded numerous 1:25,000 maps onto my phone but find that I use the ViewRanger App, far more frequently.
There are two advantages of using ViewRanger, the mapping is generally at a high enough resolution, only on a few occasions have I had to switch the OS 1:25,000 map with its detail of walls and small physical features.  Secondly, the Skyline facility enables you to take photographs, with physical features labelled, its quite handy to know that you are facing in the right direction, although I wouldn’t rely on it exclusively for navigation purposes.

ViewRanger
The map and data of todays walk.
Skyline
Using Skyline on the ViewRanger App, it names features, which we can’t even see because of low cloud. Its not an application, which I use that often but it does provide you with some extra information.

As we climbed higher conditions underfoot became more solid, clearly the temperature had dropped below freezing last night, and may still have been below zero.  The lack of wind actually made the day surprisingly warm, but it was still necessary to put on our crampons, a few hundred metres below the summit.
We didn’t hand around too long of the summit, a quick slurp of warm coffee and a Twix between us, whilst standing before we headed back towards the valley and the reasonably long walk back to the car prior to heading towards Tyndrum and coffee and cake at The Real Food Cafe.
It was another enjoyable day in the Scottish mountains and once again we were surprised by the total lack of people encountered whilst out walking.  I know that we are fortunate enough be able to go out in mid week, when it is not unusual for numbers of people in the outdoors to be reduced.  I am certain though, that if we were in the Ogwen or Langdale Valleys then we would not have had the mountain to ourselves.
For those seeking solitude and that feeling of wilderness it isn’t necessary to travel to remote corners of the world, midweek in January about 50 miles from Glasgow is always an option.

Beinn Chuirn
Nicky heading up the valley of the River Cononish. The summit Of Beinn Chuirn is above and to the right of her head. Our route pretty much followed the obvious ridge.
Beinn Chuirn
Nicky heading up the ridge on Beinn Chuirn. Some spectacular scenery behind.
Beinn Chuirn
Higher up conditions changed, there was more snow underfoot and more was falling out the sky.
Beinn Chuirn
A couple of hundred metres below the summit crampons became advisable, the rain of the last two days had clearly helped to freeze the snow higher up. It is always a pleasure fitting crampons to your boots. We don’t get that many opportunities to do so in Jersey!
Beinn Chuirn
The inevitable summit pic.
Beinn Chuirn
Crossing a stream on the descent. In places the whole stream was covered in snow. Clearly a major hazard for the walker who isn’t sure of their location.
Beinn Chuirn
We dropped below the snow and it was just a matter of heading back to the valley track and walking back to the car, 3.5 miles away.